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BioHazard1282
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Changing Storage Type

Sat Nov 30, 2019 2:49 pm

Is it possible to change the storage type on Raspbian? Like changing GiB and MiB to GB and MB? It's not a huge deal... but it's a minor annoyance.
"People are going to copy your product if you build great stuff. Just because Yahoo has a search box doesn't make it Google." ~ Evan Spiegel

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DougieLawson
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:00 pm

Not a chance.

Real computer folks use powers of two. Marketing folks use powers of ten. Never the twain shall meet (nor agree on which units to use).
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BioHazard1282
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:18 pm

Shuck it, that's too bad. Is there a GUI software where I can manage users from root (i.e. changing user permissions)?
"People are going to copy your product if you build great stuff. Just because Yahoo has a search box doesn't make it Google." ~ Evan Spiegel

Heater
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:38 pm

Yes, real computer folks have been using gigabyte, GB, and megabyte, MB, kilobyte, KB, since the dawn of time. Naturally expecting it to be understood in binary not decimal. The was no ambiguity, who would be dumb enough to count memory/storage bytes in decimal.

All this new fangled mebi, gibi gibberish only came about recently to help the uneducated. Especially when storage manufactures used their ignorance to confuse them.
Memory in C++ is a leaky abstraction .

Heater
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sat Nov 30, 2019 3:41 pm

BioHazard1282,
Is there a GUI software where I can manage users from root.
I hope not.
Memory in C++ is a leaky abstraction .

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BioHazard1282
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:00 pm

I hope there is because I have 3 other siblings who use my Pi for schoolwork and stuff (I use four Pis for much better performance) and I need a software to manage them so they don't download or delete important files. If there is one I really need to know.
"People are going to copy your product if you build great stuff. Just because Yahoo has a search box doesn't make it Google." ~ Evan Spiegel

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FTrevorGowen
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:16 pm

BioHazard1282 wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:00 pm
I hope there is because I have 3 other siblings who use my Pi for schoolwork and stuff (I use four Pis for much better performance) and I need a software to manage them so they don't download or delete important files. If there is one I really need to know.
I hope you've assigned them separate user names & accounts, group etc. (ie. not sharing user pi's access) and not given them sudo privileges! W/o "root" access via sudo and where necessary setting file/directory permissions appropriately that should prevent most things (and, of-course, change the pi password {again?} to something they don't know and is difficult to guess). No special (GUI-based) software needed - hint:

Code: Select all

pi@raspiP4B4b-32GbP:~ $ apropos user | grep add
adduser.conf (5)     - configuration file for adduser(8) and addgroup(8) .
addgroup (8)         - add a user or group to the system
adduser (8)          - add a user or group to the system
pam_issue (8)        - PAM module to add issue file to user prompt
useradd (8)          - create a new user or update default new user information
Trev.
Still running Raspbian Jessie or Stretch on some older Pi's (an A, B1, B2, B+, P2B, 3xP0, P0W, 2xP3A+, P3B+, P3B, B+, A+ and a B2) but Buster on the P4B's. See: https://www.cpmspectrepi.uk/raspberry_pi/raspiidx.htm

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BioHazard1282
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sun Dec 01, 2019 4:48 pm

They do not have sudo privileges, but they need the root password to execute sudo commands. They can't delete OS files and install/remove software. They also need their password to change settings and configs.
"People are going to copy your product if you build great stuff. Just because Yahoo has a search box doesn't make it Google." ~ Evan Spiegel

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FTrevorGowen
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Sun Dec 01, 2019 6:02 pm

BioHazard1282 wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 4:48 pm
They do not have sudo privileges, but they need the root password to execute sudo commands. They can't delete OS files and install/remove software. They also need their password to change settings and configs.
Not quite correct (unless you've enabled a "root" user). There are no such things as "sudo commands" but sudo provides a password/passwordless mechanism for users with sudo privileges to execute commands which normally require "root"privileges. By default the "pi" user uses passwordless sudo. When a "sudo" password is required it's usually that of the user with sudo access (not that of any "root" user that exists). IIRC, the sudo mechanism can limit access to various actions,device etc. but, more often, group membership and associated permissions are used to restrict "ordinary" user behaviour (protect files, directories etc.). For example the pi user is a member of these groups (gid's):

Code: Select all

pi@raspiP4B4b-32GbP:~ $ id
uid=1000(pi) gid=1000(pi) groups=1000(pi),4(adm),20(dialout),24(cdrom),27(sudo),29(audio),44(video),46(plugdev),60(games),100(users),105(input),109(netdev),997(gpio),998(i2c),999(spi)
However we're digressing from your, somewhat unclear, original (post) topic. Perhaps it's worth starting a fresh one asking explicitly for advice on how bet to restrict your siblings access to specific files. directories and or services. (This is an area where Linux/Unix methods are more versatile than some other O.S.'s)
Trev.
Still running Raspbian Jessie or Stretch on some older Pi's (an A, B1, B2, B+, P2B, 3xP0, P0W, 2xP3A+, P3B+, P3B, B+, A+ and a B2) but Buster on the P4B's. See: https://www.cpmspectrepi.uk/raspberry_pi/raspiidx.htm

bjtheone
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:58 pm

BioHazard1282 wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 4:48 pm
They do not have sudo privileges, but they need the root password to execute sudo commands. They can't delete OS files and install/remove software. They also need their password to change settings and configs.
You really can't divide it up like that. If you are allowing users to have root access, either through root login or sudo, then they have root access. There are not levels of root access. Given them sudo lets them change/modify/delete everything. You can do funky stuff like mount the OS read only, but they would still have the ability to change the setup.

A typical multi user Unix/Linux system has unprivileged users that have access to all the data in their own account (typically /home/username). They may have access to other users data (however that is controlled by the other user), and execute privileges to most (non admin) programs. You can separate out users, into different groups and allow only certain groups to have access to certain programs. They will not have access to admin programs, or the ability to change any of the system level config files. Almost all Linux programs have the concept of system and user level configs, where the system level can get amended to by the user or the user level can overrride the system level config. No need to given them access to the system level config files.

Can you provide an example of when an unprivileged user would need access to sudo to do something?

dustnbone
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Re: Changing Storage Type

Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:04 pm

It's also possible to use group permissions to grant users certain privledges they'd otherwise need superuser access for. Things like mounting storage devices, configuring network interfaces, shutting down/rebooting the system might be routine user operations in your environment but granting full access to all users isn't desirable.

https://www.linode.com/docs/tools-refer ... nd-groups/

It's worth reading up on if you're learning about Linux system administration.

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