tufty
Posts: 1456
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2011 2:32 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 12:59 pm

Splitting this off from the "any sleep mode" thread, because it's largely offtopic for that location.

TL;DR version - ranty and potentially flamebait, could well annoy.

I should probably start out by saying the following. I'm a bit grouchy at the moment; it was supposed to snow last night and didn't, but it's gonna rain this afternoon which means I can't get motivated to even go and beat myself up by doing a couple of miles vertical on the bike. Plus I've got a minor interrupt handling gotcha on my code, and I can't find an alpha board owner who's willing to give me 5 minutes help. Still, otherwise, life's peachy, thanks for asking :)

The above may well explain why I got a bit tetchy when radu said
But this board is not made for normal use, it is targeted at developers and hardware hackers
Now, I'll admit, I first came here with my "developer / hardware hacker" hat on (I was pointed here from a link on another forum where ARM devkits were being discussed). I stayed, however, because I've been seduced by the potential impact that this board could have. Not impact as in "hey, cheapo desktops / STBs / MAME machines", but impact as in "this could positively change the lives of a whole generation in the same way that the first home computers did". I really do think the project is that important, and I know that (at least) the foundation members feel that way too. But my initial (mental) reaction to reading that particular comment, particularly when followed by
personally, I don't think it will be very used in the education sector, where netbooks are more attractive and at similar prices
... was along the lines of "if you don't buy into the project, then <expletive deleted> off"

I should make it clear that I'm not targetting radu personally, more the mindset (s)he represents.

The benefit of betaing stuff like this to the (dare I say it) "Slashdot crowd" is that it gets exposure, builds a "buzz", and, above all, gets techy people on board doing useful stuff. The downside, of course, is that you also get a whole lot of hangers-on who will do nothing but piss and moan that there's "not enough RAM", the GPU isn't a 100% RMS-approved piece of open hardware, there's "binary blobs", there's no VGA, the power supply isn't right, SD card access is too slow, and a whole host of other crap that's largely irrelevant to the primary goal of the project. Because 99% of the "Slashdot crowd" can't see further than "$35 lie-nucks box" and are totally incapable of tailoring expectations based on what that device can realistically be expected to do.

And what depresses me is that, for the initial launch, I'd guess that only 1% of the first boards out will be used for anything even close to furthering that goal. As another totally "pulled from my fundament" guess, maybe 5% of those projects will actually release anything that does further the goal. With 10,000 boards due to be released initially, the math isn't hard to do (hint - the answer is 5).

As for what's gonna happen to the other 9,900 boards? I suspect a large proportion will be pushed to the back of the drawer with the rest of the seemingly promising technological stuff because they aren't powerful enough to meet unrealistically high expectations.

For the initial 100 test boards, unless some have been earmarked for the hard-working, under-recognised and on-message volunteers who are moderating this forum and / or working at getting the damn things out of the door, I have severe doubts whether any of them will be used for anything worthwhile.

That's the reason stuff like this isn't normally released as a public beta. The warts aren't exposed, the people who are part of the beta program are usually 100% on line with the goals and aims, and when you go "gold" as it were, you go direct to the intended target audience. I know that isn't possible in this case, where it seems the only way to hit the target is to go in "under the radar" with enthusiastic educators, rather than going for the bureaucrats who set the rules.

Don't get me wrong. I've not given up (far from it), nor do I think the project itself will fail (it's far to important to be allowed to fail), but I'd really like a little bit of feedback telling me I'm totally wrong in my suspicions as to why people are here. I'd really like to think that people have projects for the initial run that do something to further the actual educational goals of the project, even if it's only for themselves, rather than simply getting mentioned on hackaday.com. I know there's people here who are using this simply as an excuse to teach themselves ARM assembler, and / or linux programming, that's totally cool.

I dunno. When's it gonna snow? I want to go skiing.

Simon

Archangel5089
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2011 8:37 am

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:14 pm

I think the goal of the project is highly laudable, I will be using this to teach my nephew something about my work and I hope that this encourages schools to get more involved in early stage programming.

What I can't deny is that almost everyone on this forum is very excited about RPi for personal use. I actually see it as a driving force to get to the original goal of education. As you say, only about 1% of the boards may go to educational use for the first order but unless the supply of these boards in the future is highly constrained I do not see this being a problem.

User avatar
liz
Raspberry Pi Foundation Employee & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Foundation Employee & Forum Moderator
Posts: 5202
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:22 pm
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:16 pm

I've got ten days booked in the Sierras immediately after CES in January, so it'd better have picked up significantly by then…

I think things are not as grim as you paint them; we need the open source community to boot up an ecosystem for the device, and if some of them choose to do it by making media centres - well, that's a device a kid is going to want in the house, and which they *just might* find themselves wanting to adapt one day. As I've said before, if we get only one in a hundred kids hacking on the thing, we'll consider that an enormous win. The multimedia in particular is strong enough that I hope it'll avoid the back of the drawer syndrome in a lot of cases.

There's also a huge amount of goodwill and effort being expended by people who genuinely are writing with education in mind for the device. (A smaller percentage of those guys than I'd like post here, but hey - they're busy.) We at the foundation won't stop working on release (although I do plan on a nice skiing holiday). There will be a second, educational launch in Q2/Q3 of next year. There's lots to do - hearts and minds to win, software to prepare, learning materials to consult on, government ministers to chat up, teachers to reassure and enthuse. I reckon we can do it, and do it well.
Director of Communications, Raspberry Pi

Point3Forever
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2011 12:15 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:22 pm

I plan on using this for a hardware interface project in my computer engineering class (high school, age age 16-18). I'm trying to get my teacher interested in the raspberry pi. We spend (split cost between the school and students) more on arduinos then we would have on raspberry pi's, and we can do so much more with them. Of course, I want to use it for my own projects, but I want to do what I can to help further the goal. If that involves making what I'd create anyways demonstrate it's abilities, I'm fine with that. :)

User avatar
abishur
Posts: 4477
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 4:10 am
Location: USA
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:30 pm

LOL tufty, I love the rant! You forgot to mention the people upset that they now might have to actually solder on their own GPIO pins (I has to do works?!) :P

Fortunately, a lot of people who come here expecting a $25 beagleboard eventually figure out what's going on. They'll make an initial "I didn't read the FAQs or even glance at the most recent posts before asking (let alone try the search feature) this" question and then go and play nicely in the playground :)
Dear forum: Play nice ;-)

anakinpendragon
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2011 11:27 am

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:32 pm

I plan to make a simple computer to kids , where he can study and make simple tasks. In Brazil there are many people who can't buy a computer to your children. I plan to make money, but with a just price.

jamesh
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 23918
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:33 pm

My other half doesn't like skiiing. So I don't get to go any more, and I would like to teach the sprogs.

You lot should regard yourselves lucky!

@Tufty. I read you post re: can you try something on an Alpha, and I still didn't understand what you were asking. Will post more there.
Principal Software Engineer at Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd.
Contrary to popular belief, humorous signatures are allowed. Here's an example...
“I think it’s wrong that only one company makes the game Monopoly.” – Steven Wright

User avatar
piglet
Posts: 911
Joined: Sat Aug 27, 2011 1:16 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 1:41 pm

I care. I'm a governor at my local junior school and have just been given responsibility for working with the staff on ict....

ICT seems to consist of "using office apps". No logic. No computing as I understand it.

User avatar
crundy
Posts: 310
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2011 7:47 am

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 3:19 pm

Although I'm looking at primarily buying boards for me to mess around with, I think the idea of getting kids to play with programming and hardware at a lower lever early on is crucial. I've been a software developer since I left uni (for a degree in Pharmacology & Toxicology, not computers :) ) and although I do take the time to understand how most stuff under the hood works, I picked up my love of programming when I was 8 or 9 and was allowed to play with the new ZX speccy my dad had bought. The same can't be said of a lot of people I've worked with. I've worked with java developers who didn't know the difference between the heap and the stack, .NET developers who don't know anything about OO programming, and almost all of the developers I've worked with (who write stored procs along with their code and make web applications) don't know anything about database indexing & optimising, and I don't believe I've met anyone at work who knows how SSL actually works past "install certificate on server and get IIS/Apache to use it".

That's not to say everyone needs to know all that, but it sure as hell does help write better, more efficient applications. Thus I think the R-Pi is something that should be practically issued to schoolkids rather than them buying them (although I can't see the gov paying for it).

jamesh
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 23918
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:30 pm

What he said in last paragraph ^^^^^^^
Principal Software Engineer at Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd.
Contrary to popular belief, humorous signatures are allowed. Here's an example...
“I think it’s wrong that only one company makes the game Monopoly.” – Steven Wright

User avatar
ukscone
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4155
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 2:51 pm
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:47 pm

Quote from crundy on December 2, 2011, 15:19
Although I'm looking at primarily buying boards for me to mess around with, I think the idea of getting kids to play with programming and hardware at a lower lever early on is crucial. I've been a software developer since I left uni (for a degree in Pharmacology & Toxicology, not computers :) )

any idea what the LD50 is for the raspberry pi?

User avatar
ukscone
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4155
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 2:51 pm
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:52 pm

I'm not the target demographic for the educational release although i'm sure i'll learn something.I have failed to interest my son in anything technical other than as a user (although he has developed an interest in various nefarious activities and how they related to his major, minor at uni since he went with me to MakerFaire NY ) but a lot of friends and family have had recent additions to their number so i'll start working on corrupting them as soon as possible and the raspberry pi will be a great tool to further my evil aims. Raspberry Pi attached to a laser attached to a sharks head is one such project

User avatar
walney
Posts: 233
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:57 pm
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:56 pm

@simon: I don't think that you need to worry. To give you a sort of analogy, when the kids were small we used to take then to a local Wildfowl & Wetlands Reserve. We used to get a lot of the twitchers turning up their noses at us and our ilk... because we weren't serious bird watchers.

The point that they neglected to consider was that it was our 'ilk' that brought in a lot of funds - buying tat from the gift shop and food to feed the captive collection (which they wouldn't be seen dead with). If the centre had solely had to rely on funding from the twitchers, it probably wouldn't have been able to stay open.

So, the way I see it - it doesn't really matter what the motives are for the people that visit and intend to buy. Ultimately their cash is as good as anyone's, and the more people that buy in the better the chance of the foundation surviving financially and succeeding in their (loftier) goals.

The second reason I have for optimism: don't underestimate the power of evangelism. I intend to buy one (at least) to play with... for me... for fun. But if I can get it to work and do interesting things, you can bet that I will be spreading the word (I used to be a governor in a primary school, and still have links with them).

I'd also just like to say that I haven't bothered with the likes of Arduino before - so, for me, the enticement to give it a bash is the low cost of entry (and the prospect that if I don't end up having as much fun as I expect, then at least I can press it into service to do something useful).

User avatar
walney
Posts: 233
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:57 pm
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:59 pm

Quote from ukscone on December 2, 2011, 16:47
any idea what the LD50 is for the raspberry pi?

Depends which orifice it's inserted in.

LinuxLady
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:41 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 5:11 pm

As a lecturer, one of the things that excites me the most about the R-Pi is what it will mean for teaching.

- It will be fantastic for teaching systems programming - when a student bricks the OS, simply rewrite the SD card.
- For mobile device programming it will mean that I can have mobile devices for everybody to use and borrow - I won't have to collect in everything at the end of the practical like I do now.
- Similarly with embedded systems, and also with the benefit that we can use them in projects out in the field where they might damaged.
- Some of the experiments on mesh routing and other complex network topologies we can actually do rather than emulate
- Distributed computing - I can buy R-Pi's and use them to build simple distributed computers and outfit a lab with multiple distributed computers for a fraction of the price (and power requirements) of a conventional cluster (OK it won't have the performance, but that's not the issue for teaching)
- For teaching programming - even the students who can't afford their own computer (and yes there are some) can afford an R-Pi

And that's just the teaching - what it opens up for research is equally exciting :-).

Although I'm at the tertiary level rather than secondary I suspect that most teachers and lecturers are like me and quietly rewriting their lesson plans and writing budget proposals to their Heads whilst we wait for the R-Pi to be on sale. When we get our hands on them and can see how they can be used in the classroom, I suspect that's when you'll see interest from that community really take off.

And yes, Crundy it would be great to see them issued to all school kids, and you never know - after all it probably wouldn't cost that much more than the government spent subsidising the old Beebs :-)

User avatar
Burngate
Posts: 6059
Joined: Thu Sep 29, 2011 4:34 pm
Location: Berkshire UK Tralfamadore
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 5:19 pm

@Tufty ... there, there, as the Queen said, and the Dairy maid said, and the Alderney
I'm here because I think the goals are important. No, I won't be doing anything towards those goals, because I ain't no good at teaching, and I ain't no good at programming. So all I'll be doing is stuff for myself. So I'll be one of the 9,995. But I'll be cheering from the sidelines. And I'll go for the bo-go if it's still an option 'cos I can afford it.
So there.
So it may snow tommorrow. Then you'll be feeling better

User avatar
mkopack
Posts: 242
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:46 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 5:47 pm

Agreed with crundy above..

I think some of what we've lost in this last 25 years of computing, with Windows and such, is the simplicity of the older systems. I cut my teeth on a C64 - a machine that started immediately with the flick of a switch, and the "shell" was also the program editor and basic interpreter, etc. It meant I could immediately write programs to do things. How many of us had our first programming experience be something like this:

Walk up to computer like a C64/Vic20, TI99/4A, Atari 400/800, in a store. type in the old:

10 Print "Mike is cool"
20 goto 10
Run

And jump for joy and marvel as the computer immediately filled the screen with what you told it to do....

That has been lost in this age of multi-program, multi process, compilers, GUIs, etc. I work with PhD's in CS who, while brilliant at the computational foundation of computing, are TOTALLY LOST with any of the lower level details because they didn't get hands on with computers until the 286/386 days, so they missed out on all the fun of understanding things like "If I do a poke 36758 it will trigger my assembly code to run. And if I poke this other address I can shove more data into the 4K cassette buffer. We just KNEW our machines a lot better back then.

These days there's just so many layers between us and the hardware that it's almost impossible to totally understand all of it, and many people are lucky if they understand 5% of it.

Kids need a device like this - especially if we can give them a simple shell like we grew up in, something like the Python shell where they put in a command or line of code and see immediate results, and then can build upon that without all the extra trappings of make files, ANT build.xml files, environment variables, etc. They need to be able to try things out on an inexpensive device, make mistakes, screw things up and be able to pretty much just flip the power switch and reset it and get back to "ok, let's try it a different way."

They need a device that's simple to do simple things in, but capable enough that they can grow into as they learn and expand their abilities. Something that they realistically could turn into a small after school business writing small games and such like so many of us did in the early 80's.

And most importantly, something that's so inexpensive that they each can afford to have their own. I NEVER would have learned as much if I had to share my old C64 with my sister or parents (thankfully they never had any interest.) Allowing each student to have their own will allow them to customize, tinker, play, experiment, and fool around without fear of breaking the "family computer". Mom and Dad can pretty simply restore a broken file system by reimaging the SD card, etc. That was one thing I always loved about those old 8-bits - If anything gets messed up, a power cycle brings you back to a clean slate. By the time I got to High School, actually having students USE the PC's in the labs there was almost considered a no-no because the school didn't have the resources to "fix stuff the kids break". so the labs largely went empty and unused. With the RPi's pricetag it could conceivably be made a purchase requirement for each student to bring their own to class and zero investment for the school (beyond maybe displays+keyboards/mice.)

Bacan
Posts: 347
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2011 10:03 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 5:53 pm

It is a pebble in the pond, causing a ripple.
Seeds being cast upon the ground; some will sprout, some will lay dormant.

Of those first 10,000 units, think of all who will see it when the owner shows it off and brags about it being a "$25.00 computer".

I learned not to full share my plans and ideas on the forum, during this time period in the R-Pi's life. Now is the time for Geeks/Early Adopters/Makers/Hackers/Gamers/Media Machiners. Later on, I'll smile when new forum members with my ideas, like those I have now for spreading the cards into the educational system become forum members. It may require a different forum space to keep the geek/maker/hacker/...'s from the Ivory Tower/Educational/Teachers/Parents. Each group may have members that do not understand the others in that 'other' forum.

This member of the forum is selective about what and with whom they share their ideas. I'm going for the action and results speaks the loudest.

Wishing you Snow.
If you really need a snow-fix. The resorts at the summit of I-80, near Lake Tahoe are Open !

PiOfCube
Posts: 96
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 10:09 am
Contact: Website

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 6:42 pm

I'm wearing two hats with regards to the Raspberry Pi.

As an individual (my own "PiOfCube's YouTube videos et al) I will be "messing around" with the Raspberry Pi and make stuff like media streamers for the tutorials. However, even a media streamer would be of great educational benefit for those that do not have a PC and by using a R-Pi just for media streaming could give people access to educational resources via YouTube, Khan Academy and other things like that.

As Chair of "Open Indie Project Dot Org" (a non-profit organisation) I will be doing some pretty serious stuff in the form of fully tested circuit designs and assembly instructions (which will be released under an Open Source licence). We will not be selling finished products that use the R-Pi, just publishing the diagrams and related documentation so anyone can make use of them (the plans) at no cost. These devices will probably include audiometers, portable field medical support units, emergency notification systems, classroom support units and many other things. We will really have to wait for the R-Pi to get into full production before we start pushing these ideas for obvious reasons. In some cases, these ideas will probably not come close to anything that is available to the UK and USA and in some cases they will probably not have the same sensitivity. However, in the case of audiometers, you can easily pay £1,000 (GBP) for a basic unit. After doing some prototyping, we may find that the Raspberry Pi might just do the same job (and also include a patient database system for the local health worker) for approximately £40-£50 (GBP). Even if it isn't within the same tolerances as the £1K+ versions, it would still be of great benefit to those that simply wouldn't have the chance to be tested on such expensive equipment.
- 1BillionHex aka PiOfCube: 68719476738 -

willlim
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2011 12:16 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 7:37 pm

I believe in the initial idea of the project, but at same time i live in a Developing country(Brazil), and in here the education isn't the best thing, put programming like a class is something restrict to some high expansive schools or public models schools.
The market to target in her to R-Pi is as low-cost desktop, and to do this is needed translate to portuguese every software,develope a very simple interface for configuration, create a case to R-pi, put as many games is possible and sold a price similar at low cost video-games like polystation, to do this is needed create a box whit 2 Joypad, mouse, keyboard, lots of game, text editor, web browser, suport a many audio/video formats, cables to plug all this and power source. an mantain the cost under 80,00 USD whit is very hard considering the taxes in here.

My personal interest in the R-pi is for projects and gadgets DIY(hobbie), but i already partake in social projects related whit tecnologe and education and know the importance from a low cost hardware to facilitate the access on many people that possible.

toxibunny
Posts: 1382
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2011 9:21 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 7:47 pm

I started off as a 'want one to hack into a cool little case and play SNES games on it', then realised I'd played all the SNES games already, then read the post about Qt and discovered what QML was, and found out what python was, now I'm all just wanting to learn to program on it, and coming up with game ideas. Bring it on! :D
note: I may or may not know what I'm talking about...

toxibunny
Posts: 1382
Joined: Thu Aug 18, 2011 9:21 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 7:47 pm

I started off as a 'want one to hack into a cool little case and play SNES games on it', then realised I'd played all the SNES games already, then read the post about Qt and discovered what QML was, and found out what python was, now I'm all just wanting to learn to program on it, and coming up with game ideas. Bring it on! :D
note: I may or may not know what I'm talking about...

radu
Posts: 110
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 8:19 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 7:49 pm

Ok, perhaps I didn't make myself clear in the posts on the other thread.
I don't think the RPi will be useful (or used) as a GENERAL PURPOSE computer for teaching kids programming in schools.
Look at this computer: http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....155218-L0C

Processor: Intel Pentium 4 2.8GHz
Memory: 512MB
Hard Drive: 80GB
Optical Drive 1: DVD
All this for 105 bucks shipped.

For the RPi, you will still need a case, power supply probably powered USB hub, WiFi, SD card, a case, a keyboard and mouse, and of course, a monitor. This makes it expensive, sometimes more expensive than netbooks. And you won't be able to do as many things as a netbook can, because of the limited RAM and cpu/gpu power.
In 3rd world countries, you can't count on electricity. So you would need something that consumes as little as possible. A netbook will consume just a few watts. A RPI and an old (CRT) TV will consume 100W. A RPI and a new TV will consume ~50watts.
And then there are some tablets you can buy for around 100 USD too, or even cheaper, which have everything you need to teach kids programming, except for a keyboard.

On the other hand, I think the RPI is a very useful educational tool when it comes to electronics and robotics. It is the cheapest Linux dev board out there, and I can see universities and high schools all over the world using it. Because if you ruin 25-35 usd, you won't cry for it.

LinuxLady
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2011 4:41 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 8:58 pm

I think you are missing the point Radu - there is a big difference between what an individual user might by and what a school or Uni might buy. I really don't want in my teaching labs old, refurbished computers which will be a nightmare to maintain and cost more in the long run than if I bought new devices. Netbooks are useless as general purpose PCs as without external monitors and keyboards they risk not meeting accessibility legislation requirements for teaching in the UK. Yet at home I have refurbished servers and my own netbook and am grateful for them.

The R-Pi meets the sweet price point that people can buy them and use them at home and at school so students can have their own. If something goes wrong, restoring them is a dream and as to the IO, well that doesn't have anything like as much affect on my TCO as at home they can use their TV (or family TV) and at school/Uni I can have the IO set up without much difficulty and maintenance is much less than that of a PC.

The software that is used for teaching is also likely to be a rather constrained set so the lack of available software isn't as much of an issue, but on the other hand it is likely to do the main things that you want it to do.

From what I have seen of the R-Pi, the TCO is going to be much less than a desktop once the initial familiarisation hurdle has been breached and that is going to be very attractive to educators at all levels.

radu
Posts: 110
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 8:19 pm

Re: How many here actually *care* about the goals of the project?

Fri Dec 02, 2011 9:22 pm

In 'first world' countries, cost for computers in universities is usually not an issue. They would look for other criteria first, such as: How versatile is it? Does it have tech support? Can our teachers use them, without having to spend time and money to go to courses and stuff?
In poor countries, the cost can be the first criteria, but if I were a school IT guy in a poor country, responsible for buying computers, I would go for netbooks. Why? Because they can do MORE.
If many of the students don't have a computer at home, you don't want to teach them only about programming. You also should teach them a bit about Windows (which happens to be the most used OS), maybe some office programs (does LibreOffice even run on the RPI?), and so on. And video chatting capabilities wouldn't hurt either.

Return to “Off topic discussion”