berighteous
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how do you hide all the boot text?

Mon Sep 17, 2012 7:47 pm

hi! When I start my pi I don't want to see miles of text I don't care about scrolling up the screen. Can I hide that junk and put a splash screen up instead?

Thanks

dot-notdot
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Mon Sep 17, 2012 8:48 pm

http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewt ... 9&p=174897

Should work nicely for you but there's nothing on how to get a splash screen up as I'm no expert with a frame buffer

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:25 am

wow that's complicated.

This linux experience is totally backwards. It should NOT show all that boot text unless you WANT to see it! It should hide it all until you ASK to see it, like every other operating system.

you should have to work TO see the text, not have to work NOT to see it.

I mean really, who critically reads at all that stuff after they get the machine booting correctly the first time? Not every boot. It becomes just an endless stream of garbage we're forced to look at .

Thanx for the link. If I can figure it out it'll be useful. I only want to be able to turn my pi on and then have an arcade game magically appear a few seconds later.

teeth_03
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:06 am

its there for debugging reasons

and lets face it,especially the versions of linux we are running on the Pi, there WILL be bugs

have you booted Windows into safe mode recently? Its basically the same thing.

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 3:57 am

yes, but windows only does it when you specifically ask to boot in safe mode. Would it have killed someone to just have a quiet = yes or no ? lol.

I tried editing the files and I monkeyed up something so I had to wipe the sd and berry boot again. <sigh>

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:24 am

It really is a powerful thing to see what is happening in the background it does take some getting used to especially when you think it's just a small computer but it is nice to know when one of your hard drives has died or similar issues before you walk away thinking everything is fine.
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 7:27 am

This isn't windows! Linux is not "backwards".

Distribution that run on the RasPi are still in their infancy, and still under development. Most people want that text.

If you want something that is super pretty, Ubuntu 12.04 (only for your desktop computer) has none of the text. However it is mature and has been worked on for years.

Linux is what you make it. If you don't like text you are more than welcome, in fact encouraged, to build your own distribution and give it away to other people that don't like text
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jojopi
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 7:56 am

berighteous wrote:wow that's complicated.
Anyone who wants to hide the boot messages is obviously not curious about what is going on inside the system. So it should not be surprising if they give suboptimal advice.

The easy way to hide all boot messages is to remove "console=tty1" from /boot/cmdline.txt. This also has the advantage that you can put it back (on another machine) if subsequent boots start to fail.

Slightly more sensible would be to change it to "console=tty9 loglevel=3". This moves the distro messages to another console, so you can press Ctrl+Alt+F9 to see them, and restricts the kernel messages to critical errors only, so you will at least be told if something is seriously wrong or the boot has failed.

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 9:52 am

This linux experience is totally backwards.
The point of the Raspberry Pi is that it's designed for learning about computers. It allows you to get under the hood and tinker with it. If you are editing startup scripts and there is a problem, then it's useful (perhaps essential) to be able to see those messages. That's one of the reasons the boot up messages haven't been hidden and one of the reasons it starts at a text command prompt rather than booting straight into LXDE.

If the computer was a car then Windows would be like having your bonnet locked down with a special key that only Microsoft could open, mainstream Linux distributions on a PC would have a bonnet that you can open yourself, but the Raspberry Pi doesn't have a bonnet at all - so it's easy to get in and see how it works and improve it as you wish. You can't learn much about how it works from an engine you can't even see.

You can hide the boot text and you could have it booting straight into a graphical login - which is what most desktop Linux distributions do, but if you are going to just click icons and aren't interested in learning about how the computer works you may be better off using a desktop computer with a mainstream distribution (Ubuntu / Mint etc.) or a Linux based Android tablet.

In answer to your initial question - of course you can. If you read this thread there are suggestions on how to redirect the messages away from the screen and if you search the forum there have already been discussions on booting to a graphical login. You can learn quite a lot about the way computers work in just working through that.

The final part of introducing a splash screen is more complicated. You would probably want to take a look at Splashy, but it's not in the repositories for the Raspberry Pi so it will probably involve compiling from source which is an advanced task. With the risk of breaking the boot process you may want to capture the startup messages to help you out if things go wrong.

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:30 am

Thanks all for your input. Rerouting the text to a file I can read if I need to makes more sense, or with a keypress as it's booting. I'll take a look at all your suggestions and see if I can do them without blowing up the OS again. lol.

I'm amused by all the "You should be reading all this text so you can learn" stuff. Once the system is running we only care about our work. I want to see error messages, sure. but most of the stuff scrolling by is 1) too fast to read anyway, and 2) normal housekeeping stuff that being displayed just for the sake of displaying it.

My personal end use is to have a pi in an arcade machine. The player doesn't care about the linux gibberish, and he won't be able to do use the info anyway. He needs to be able to turn on the machine and start playing a game.

I'm not changing or adding anything to the operating system, nothing changing the stuff being loaded. The messages shouldn't ever change. I shouldn't have to read them EVERY SINGLE TIME I have to reboot to test the software configuration.

Oh, and I'm not using the windowing environment at all. I just want to boot, see a nice splash screen, and then have the emulator front end take over.

I appreciate the help. Sorry if my musings about the usefulness of the boot text ruffled any feathers.

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:46 am

jojopi wrote:
The easy way to hide all boot messages is to remove "console=tty1" from /boot/cmdline.txt. This also has the advantage that you can put it back (on another machine) if subsequent boots start to fail.
.
ok how do I actually do this? I looked at /boot/ and the only .txt file is config.txt. The more I bang on this linux thing the less I understand about linux.

1) how do I get to the file from the command prompt when I boot the system?
2) How do I edit it?

I set this thing up with the berry boot thing, and know nothing about it, other than it's called Wheezy for some unknown reason. lol. thanks for the help.

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:53 am

berighteous wrote:Thanks all for your input. Rerouting the text to a file I can read if I need to makes more sense, or with a keypress as it's booting. I'll take a look at all your suggestions and see if I can do them without blowing up the OS again. lol.

I'm amused by all the "You should be reading all this text so you can learn" stuff. Once the system is running we only care about our work. I want to see error messages, sure. but most of the stuff scrolling by is 1) too fast to read anyway, and 2) normal housekeeping stuff that being displayed just for the sake of displaying it.

My personal end use is to have a pi in an arcade machine. The player doesn't care about the linux gibberish, and he won't be able to do use the info anyway. He needs to be able to turn on the machine and start playing a game.

I'm not changing or adding anything to the operating system, nothing changing the stuff being loaded. The messages shouldn't ever change. I shouldn't have to read them EVERY SINGLE TIME I have to reboot to test the software configuration.

Oh, and I'm not using the windowing environment at all. I just want to boot, see a nice splash screen, and then have the emulator front end take over.

I appreciate the help. Sorry if my musings about the usefulness of the boot text ruffled any feathers.
Interestingly, early arcade games displayed their own version of the startup text you see in Linux as they went through their self tests. See most early games in Mame for prime examples....so in a way, the scrolling text makes your device MORE like these original arcade games ;-)
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:54 am

jamesh wrote: Interestingly, early arcade games displayed their own version of the startup text you see in Linux as they went through their self tests. See most early games in Mame for prime examples....so in a way, the scrolling text makes your device MORE like these original arcade games ;-)
and very useful they where when you had to try and fix them ..... ;-p
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berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:26 pm

yes, but the arcade machines didn't have 10 miles of scrolling text. They have less than 10 items per page and if there's a problem they make you do something about it.

Can someone please help me with the simple request? Making fun of me because I don't want to read 5000 lines of text is mean.

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 1:11 pm

At what point have people 'made fun'? I'm not seeing it - and BTW your question was answered above, apart from Splash screen, which is pretty complicated.
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berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 1:20 pm

I'm asking how to go up and everybody is telling how nice it is to go down. lol.

I asked how to edit the file mentioned previously. I can't find it.

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 1:45 pm

berighteous wrote:I set this thing up with the berry boot thing, and know nothing about it, other than it's called Wheezy for some unknown reason.
BerryBoot is very nifty and all, but it completely changes the way the kernel starts up and mounts the root filesystem, compared to downloading the recommended images and installing them directly to a card.

It hides the real /boot to discourage you from upgrading the kernel, which will break it. It is also proprietary, so strictly speaking you should ask the author whether there is a method to disable boot messages that does not break the user interface and works with all the supported distros.

Having said that, if you using BerryBoot 1.2 with Raspbian wheezy 2012-08-16 only, I believe it will still work to mount the real /boot and then edit cmdline.txt directly:

Code: Select all

sudo mount /dev/mmcblk0p1 /boot
sudo nano /boot/cmdline.txt
Add " console=tty9 loglevel=3" to the end of the first line. Ctrl+X Yes ENTER to exit and save, then "sudo reboot".

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 7:52 pm

Thanks. That got rid of the miles of scrolling text. I appreciate a simple solution.

Is there any way to get rid of or hide he
"Last login: monday sep 17... The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software yadda yadda yadda type 'startx' to launch a graphical session."
message? maybe a quick screen clear or something?

Now I know I'm treading on the patience of people here, but...
Um, replacing the raspberry in the upper left corner of the screen while it boots? It's probably impossibly complicated isn't it? Silly me would expect it to just be a picture file that the code is loading somewhere that we could just replace with a same parameter image...

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:02 pm

berighteous wrote:Thanks. That got rid of the miles of scrolling text. I appreciate a simple solution.

Is there any way to get rid of or hide he
"Last login: monday sep 17... The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software yadda yadda yadda type 'startx' to launch a graphical session."
message? maybe a quick screen clear or something?

Now I know I'm treading on the patience of people here, but...
Um, replacing the raspberry in the upper left corner of the screen while it boots? It's probably impossibly complicated isn't it? Silly me would expect it to just be a picture file that the code is loading somewhere that we could just replace with a same parameter image...
Look at /etc/motd

It is a text file you can change. However, if you do an update, it may put stuff back into it.

Code: Select all

# cat /etc/motd

The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software;
the exact distribution terms for each program are described in the
individual files in /usr/share/doc/*/copyright.

Debian GNU/Linux comes with ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTY, to the extent
permitted by applicable law.

Type 'startx' to launch a graphical session
Also check your .bashrc script which can have info in it that is displayed at the end.

Curious... how often does the player of the arcade game reboot the computer? Wouldn't think that would be common.
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jojopi
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:11 pm

berighteous wrote:"Last login: monday sep 17... The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software yadda yadda yadda type 'startx' to launch a graphical session."
"touch ~/.hushlogin" will disable all those messages for the current user.

"logo.nologo" in cmdline.txt will disable the raspberry. To change it to something else you would need to compile a custom kernel. That is not really a beginner task. I believe there is a guide to kernel compilation in the wiki somewhere.

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 8:44 pm

In all of our attempts so far to "psycho-analyze" the OP, I'm surprised that no one has asked the obvious question, which is: Why does it bother you? You end up sounding a lot like people who complain about sex and violence on TV - are they not capable of looking away? Are their eyes glued open, Clockwork Orange style?

I do think that a lot of the posters on this thread have endorsed the correct view, which is that it is good that the booting text is there. If you don't want to look at it, you don't have to. Just look away, or read the paper, or whatever...

BTW, it annoys me that Windows hides it from you - and I'll tell you why. It is because when a boot takes a long, long time (and you are sitting there looking at a meaningless, unchanging screen - saying something dorky like "Welcome"), you end up biting your nails wondering if it is ever going to finish booting and get to displaying the desktop. Or has it crashed loading some device driver or whatever???

Yes, I know there are workarounds - ways to turn it back on - but A) That is a pain and B) It is not commonly known - and not standardized - you'd have to look it up every time you need it, etc, etc.
And some folks need to stop being fanboys and see the forest behind the trees.

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Tue Sep 18, 2012 10:30 pm

jojopi wrote:BerryBoot is very nifty and all, but it completely changes the way the kernel starts up and mounts the root filesystem, compared to downloading the recommended images and installing them directly to a card.

It hides the real /boot to discourage you from upgrading the kernel, which will break it. It is also proprietary, so strictly speaking you should ask the author whether there is a method to disable boot messages that does not break the user interface and works with all the supported distros.
Code is on github nowadays and not proprietary.
Question is whether the poster needs to have the boot menu displayed, or only used Beryboot as installation method for Wheezy?
Some people do not use it to have multiple operating systems, but just to avoid having to install image writing software, or because they have a small SD card on which the standard image does not fit.

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Wed Sep 19, 2012 12:02 am

Dweeber wrote: Curious... how often does the player of the arcade game reboot the computer? Wouldn't think that would be common.
They have to turn the thing on to play a game. I just want to hide all the behind the scenes stuff as much as possible to make it closer to the original arcade experience.

The pi will be mounted in an arcade cabinet with an on/off switch. They turn it on, see a splash screen saying system loading and then the game or front end plays.

I do this all the time with dos and windows computers for mame machines. The problem with old computers is every one has a different configuration and it's a nightmare finding drivers, etc to get them running. I want to see if the Pi can solve that problem. A single, inexpensive standard configuration for several machines. Once I figure it out for this pi, anyways.

So far, the pi won't play some of the games I would like for some cabinets, but for a retro 80's bartop it looks like it would be nifty. Gotta get rid of all my old TV's somehow and the games look great on them.

berighteous
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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Wed Sep 19, 2012 12:27 am

Max wrote: Question is whether the poster needs to have the boot menu displayed, or only used Beryboot as installation method for Wheezy?
Some people do not use it to have multiple operating systems, but just to avoid having to install image writing software, or because they have a small SD card on which the standard image does not fit.
I saw the berry boot thing on the forum here and said, "That's simpler. Let it do all the configuring."

I just wanted it up and running so I could see what it's got. I don't want to have to spend time trying to figure out how to install an operating system. Let me play with the system and learn what it can do, and then once I know something I can branch out and experiment with setting up a custom install.

I don't need the berry boot menu.

Here I go again. Please forgive me for asking...
What is the rainbow color box when it boots? Is it a photo or is it system generated... and why is it on there at all? I don't mind it, but if I can change it to something more meaningful I'd like to.

I appreciate your patience. I'm curious about how much we can customize the pi experience. I'm stuck with nasty texty startup things on the old computers I've been using. I really would like something cleaner. Faster would be good. The fastest sd card I had lying around is class 2 and it takes 45 seconds from start to command prompt. (I set it to auto log in) I'm sorry I'm asking too many separate questions at once... lol. You've all been so helpful, the questions keep popping in...

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Re: how do you hide all the boot text?

Wed Sep 19, 2012 1:23 am

berighteous wrote: Here I go again. Please forgive me for asking...
What is the rainbow color box when it boots? Is it a photo or is it system generated... and why is it on there at all? I don't mind it, but if I can change it to something more meaningful I'd like to.

I appreciate your patience. I'm curious about how much we can customize the pi experience. I'm stuck with nasty texty startup things on the old computers I've been using. I really would like something cleaner. Faster would be good. The fastest sd card I had lying around is class 2 and it takes 45 seconds from start to command prompt. (I set it to auto log in) I'm sorry I'm asking too many separate questions at once... lol. You've all been so helpful, the questions keep popping in...
Its a splash screen generated by the boot process. Part of the boot loader. I'm sure there is a way to lose it, but it would require most likely recompiling the bootloader/process. Just a wild guess, but it is most likely not an actual image but rather a mathematical generated image (doesn't use up space)... but that is just a guess.

You might run into issues with the power suddenly dropping on this. Unlike DOS, you can corrupt the SDCard if power is dropped at the wrong time. There are threads on this.

There is a thread about SDCard classes and what speed you get from them as well. If I recall, anything faster than Class 4 is most likely not going to make a different. My current RPi's take 58 seconds from start to login prompt. but that is also including the setup of a WiFi connection....

o Rasbpian OS
o WiFi USB in the unit
o No keyboard, mouse
o Attached to HDMI tv.

WiFi... now that would make for an interesting game.... one of the most adictive games I played when it first came out was a maze game which you played against other players connected to the local network. Spent hours after work playing that. Long before the Internet.
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