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makem
Posts: 271
Joined: Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:22 pm

Moving from Rpib+ to Rpi2

Wed Sep 02, 2015 10:47 pm

I have a B+ which is being used as a backup system with 2 1T HDs. I also have a Rpi2 which is used for a VPN and other purposes.

The B+ is quite slow and I am considering using a Rpi2. Problem is, I don't have enough knowledge to combine the two purposes on the one Rpi2 and would like it to obtain another Rpi2 and make a micro card to just make a straight replacement.

I have done some searching and found suggested ways of updating the original ARM6 to ARM7 on the SD card, transferring it to a micro SD card. This was for a B to B+

I am currently using xubuntu and have a small Windows 10 as dual boot. I don't make much use of windows now.

Would it be as easy as it appears? Update, write a new micro SD, pop it into a Rpi2, connect up the drives etc and away?

Tom_A
Posts: 272
Joined: Fri Dec 06, 2013 8:34 am

Re: Moving from Rpib+ to Rpi2

Thu Sep 03, 2015 6:50 am

makem wrote:I have a B+ which is being used as a backup system with 2 1T HDs. I also have a Rpi2 which is used for a VPN and other purposes.

The B+ is quite slow and I am considering using a Rpi2. Problem is, I don't have enough knowledge to combine the two purposes on the one Rpi2 and would like it to obtain another Rpi2 and make a micro card to just make a straight replacement.

I have done some searching and found suggested ways of updating the original ARM6 to ARM7 on the SD card, transferring it to a micro SD card. This was for a B to B+

I am currently using xubuntu and have a small Windows 10 as dual boot. I don't make much use of windows now.

Would it be as easy as it appears? Update, write a new micro SD, pop it into a Rpi2, connect up the drives etc and away?
The B+ is ARM6. The necessary update for Raspbian makes the chip worth with both ARM6 and ARM7 though. If you have already updated enough for ARM7 support, the chip should just plug right in to a new RPi2 and work.

If you want to use Ubuntu to make a duplicate drive, you can use the Disk Utility program included and also Gparted to move partitions around if necessary for USB install. Another option I have had luck with for cloning a system is using Grsync to copy the files over. Neat thing is I've been able to do this successfully on a running system. You need to make sure that all the settings are correct for things to copy over correctly. See my blog post:
http://www.technicallytom.com/2015/07/2 ... berry-pi/

Note, the blog post is for moving an install to USB using Grsync, but it should have enough information there for simply cloning to another SD card, as long as you have an SD card reader to plug into the Pi. Ubuntu on a full desktop will be faster, however you can choose to use Grsync for that as well if you want. It avoids copying empty space like dd does.

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