alicia454
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 3:34 pm

Re: TrueCrypt, is it practical?

Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:51 pm

It should be possible to port the x86 linux version of TrueCrypt to this device, and get container and/or full drive encryption. But will it be practical, or might it be too slow, or use up too much memory to run other apps at the same time?

I work with people that live in repressive regimes, and this would be very beneficial in hiding their browser history, documents, and media files.

It is also useful for anyone interested in cloud/network storage since TrueCrypt containers can be mounted remotely.

Johannes
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun Jul 31, 2011 8:05 pm

Re: TrueCrypt, is it practical?

Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:12 pm

Truecrypt can be compiled for ARM and it will work, but the Raspi doesn't have hardware AES support, so it will be slow (single-digit MB/s using all CPU time). Linux also supports full disk encryption out of the box. It's not going to be fast either though.

ShiftPlusOne
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 6086
Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 5:36 pm
Location: The unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy

Re: TrueCrypt, is it practical?

Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:53 pm

I think it would make more sense to encrypt certain folders using linux's own encryption methods.

alicia454
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 3:34 pm

Re: TrueCrypt, is it practical?

Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:21 pm

It is much more efficient and faster to encrypt disk blocks than to do folder or file encryption.

Maybe a future pi version can have some hardware accelerated crypto. I think the demand for this will increase post Arab spring, as more people use social networking to organize against repression.

Yes smart phones play am important role, but you can't easily create documents or websites on them. The raspberry pi is the cheapest platform I have come across for document and content creation.

rwaltman
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2011 3:16 pm

Re: TrueCrypt, is it practical?

Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:36 pm

ShiftPlusOne I think it would make more sense to encrypt certain folders using linux's own encryption methods.

That would not offer the same "plausible deniability" that truecrypt provides.

alicia454
Maybe a future pi version can have some hardware accelerated crypto.
...
The raspberry pi is the cheapest platform I have come across for document and content creation.

I understand the SOC in the Raspberry Pi includes an (undocumented) DSP.
It may be possible to use it to accelerate encryption functions.

Regarding cost - Old PCs can be bought for a cost similar to a Raspberry Pi "system" (board + keyboard + mouse + power supply)
They may not be up of the task, if the task is playing modern games or transcoding videos, but they are still perfectly capable of "document and content creation"
--
Roberto Waltman

alicia454
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 3:34 pm

Re: TrueCrypt, is it practical?

Wed Sep 07, 2011 1:59 am

Size/portability is an huge benefit. I can hand carry dozens of the pi's in my carry-on baggage.

Power consumption is another huge benefit, especially in those places without stable power or deliberate power cuts. At approx. 1W, the pi's can be powered by hand generator or batteries. E-ink technology may offer cheap low powered displays in the near future.

Simpler more stable design with fewer parts, less likely to break down, or need repairs or replacements, than a traditional PC.

PI will run a modern embedded OS that is more likely to have more current kernel and userland (including application) security patches than an old PC that is not capable of running the newest Windows release. The PI can be configured as a simply turn-key device, which can be much easier for the end user as well, then you typical desktop OS.

You don't get size, weight, power consumption, stability, up-to-date, & simplicity benefits with old clunky PC's.

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