Lucifer22334
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Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:15 am

Hi all,

I am creating a Power Supply to provide RPi and Arduino nano Individual power but RPi and Arduino will be Connected to each other through RX and TX.

I have read that max Power Supply to Arduino nano is 5.1V 1A and RPi is 5.1V and 2.5A. So I am Not Able to decide how will I provide them Individual Power Supply. Do not Want to Use Two Sepearte Charger, Power Supply, etc.

Want Something Like 230V AC to 5V 3A DC and Provide them Parallely. Is this Possible?

Is there Another Way to Do it? Please Guide Me.

LTolledo
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:28 am

A bi-directional level shifter is needed between the TX-RX lines from RPi to Arduino

or else... bye bye RPi
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Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:35 am

LTolledo wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:28 am
A bi-directional level shifter is needed between the TX-RX lines from RPi to Arduino

or else... bye bye RPi
Sorry, I am not getting your Answer. My RPi and Arduino will be Working as Master-slave. I have Tried powering Arduino nano by USB connection to RPi but Voltage and Current Were not enough to make Other Sensors and device Run Which are connected with RPi and Arduino.

So I thought of Providing Both Individual Power Source, and they will work in Master-Slave Greatly.

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B.Goode
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:54 am

Lucifer22334 wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:35 am
LTolledo wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:28 am
A bi-directional level shifter is needed between the TX-RX lines from RPi to Arduino

or else... bye bye RPi
Sorry, I am not getting your Answer. My RPi and Arduino will be Working as Master-slave. I have Tried powering Arduino nano by USB connection to RPi but Voltage and Current Were not enough to make Other Sensors and device Run Which are connected with RPi and Arduino.

So I thought of Providing Both Individual Power Source, and they will work in Master-Slave Greatly.


Perhaps take advice from the Raspberry Pi Foundation:
There are three GPIO banks on BCM2835.

Each of the three banks has its own VDD input pin. On Raspberry Pi, all GPIO banks are supplied from 3.3V. Connection of a GPIO to a voltage higher than 3.3V will likely destroy the GPIO block within the SoC.
Ref: https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentati ... /README.md

and
However, both [uarts] are 3.3V devices, which means extra care must be taken when connecting up to an RS232 or other system that utilises different voltage levels. An adapter must be used to convert the voltage levels between the two protocols. Alternatively, 3.3V USB UART adapters can be purchased for very low prices.
Ref: https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentati ... on/uart.md

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 11:16 am

You can use a single power supply for both of them, so long as the voltage is correct (you stated 5.1v) and the current sourcing capability of your power supply is greater than what both boards will be demanding. To me, a 3A supply will probably be OK for both boards, but just for the boards only. If you add peripherals, a hat board, a display or SSD, you probably would want to up that to about 4A or more.

So long as the current sourcing capability of your supply is greater than the demand, you should be OK. A high amperage power supply won't damage either board, as that isn't the way it works. The voltage needs to be correct, but the boards will only draw the current they need. So if you have a 4 or 5 amp supply, and the Arduino needs ~1A and the Pi needs ~2A, you still have some overhead. A little current sourcing overhead is a good thing because (depending on the peripherals connected) the current demand might vary. If the demand is more than the supply will provide, the voltage will droop and things may stop working or possibly not work as expected.

Quite often a case like this arises where you want to power multiple devices from the same power supply. What I do is make a small power distribution board so I can fan out the connections to whatever needs to be powered. I happen to have a bunch of 5v 4A power supplies, so this is what I typically use, even for just a Pi alone.

As for your RX-TX connections between the Arduino and Pi, you do want to have a level shifter on these lines between the boards as LTolledo had stated. The Arduino is a 5V system, and will transition the data line from close to ground up to close to 5V. The Pi is a 3.3V system, so if you put 5V on an input to the Pi, you'll damage the board.

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:37 pm

thanks.
Last edited by Lucifer22334 on Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:41 pm

JohnsUPS wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 11:16 am
You can use a single power supply for both of them, so long as the voltage is correct (you stated 5.1v) and the current sourcing capability of your power supply is greater than what both boards will be demanding. To me, a 3A supply will probably be OK for both boards, but just for the boards only. If you add peripherals, a hat board, a display or SSD, you probably would want to up that to about 4A or more.

So long as the current sourcing capability of your supply is greater than the demand, you should be OK. A high amperage power supply won't damage either board, as that isn't the way it works. The voltage needs to be correct, but the boards will only draw the current they need. So if you have a 4 or 5 amp supply, and the Arduino needs ~1A and the Pi needs ~2A, you still have some overhead. A little current sourcing overhead is a good thing because (depending on the peripherals connected) the current demand might vary. If the demand is more than the supply will provide, the voltage will droop and things may stop working or possibly not work as expected.

Quite often a case like this arises where you want to power multiple devices from the same power supply. What I do is make a small power distribution board so I can fan out the connections to whatever needs to be powered. I happen to have a bunch of 5v 4A power supplies, so this is what I typically use, even for just a Pi alone.

As for your RX-TX connections between the Arduino and Pi, you do want to have a level shifter on these lines between the boards as LTolledo had stated. The Arduino is a 5V system and will transition the data line from close to ground up to close to 5V. The Pi is a 3.3V system, so if you put 5V on an input to the Pi, you'll damage the board.
Ok, So I can Provide it 5.1V and 3 or 4A. Can you Please Show me your schematic for making 5V 4A Power Supply? And can you Suggest me a distribution board making video or site?

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:55 pm

Lucifer22334 wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:41 pm
Ok, So I can Provide it 5.1V and 3 or 4A. Can you Please Show me your schematic for making 5V 4A Power Supply?
The initial question you asked is ample proof that you don't understand enough about electricity to safely undertake making a power supply from a schematic. Buy one.

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 1:06 pm

Can't do Sir, I have to make one So that I can Learn and Grow.So to let me grow and Learn by providing your Schematic.

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 2:53 pm

Learn to search it in the internet, then you can grow (as well as your expenses)
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Come to me with 'problems' and I'll help you find solutions"

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:00 pm

Mains electricity can destroy your PI, burn your house or in the worst case kill you or your family.
  1. Please take drgeoff's advice and buy a properly designed PSU (5V1 4A is about right).
  2. If you must build one, first you must learn about mains wiring practices, then all the safety codes for your country. You should get a qualified electrician or electrical engineer to check your design, and then your construction, BEFORE you connect it to the mains. You should get the finished PSU professionally tested BEFORE you connect it to your PI. If you can't do any of this, see 1 above.
No responsible contributor here would think about trying to instruct you about mains safety over the forum, it is not a suitable subject for remote learning (because we cannot see what you are doing at each stage). Also, you cannot judge the competance of anyone who offers you a design for mains powered equipment. I would also caution against using any design you find on the web, since it may not meet your country's requirements. You still need a local qualified supervisor.
Last edited by davidcoton on Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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achrn
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:05 pm

Lucifer22334 wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:41 pm
JohnsUPS wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 11:16 am
I happen to have a bunch of 5v 4A power supplies, so this is what I typically use, even for just a Pi alone.
Ok, So I can Provide it 5.1V and 3 or 4A. Can you Please Show me your schematic for making 5V 4A Power Supply?
He says he has a bunch of 4A power supplies, not that he made his own power supplies.

I have lots of power supplies that I didn't make. I wouldn't make a power supply now (though I have made linear supplies in the past) because switched mode units are now so plentiful and it makes much more sense just to buy one than build one.

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:15 pm

LTolledo wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 10:28 am
A bi-directional level shifter is needed between the TX-RX lines from RPi to Arduino

or else... bye bye RPi
And there should also be a ground connection between the Arduino or the RPI, or nothing will happen. Current needs a continuous uninterrupted loop.

And yes, building your own AC to DC supply without having the full knowledge of an electrician is dangerous, you should not do it unsupervised.
The 5V output of the supply can be split (both GND and +5V) and wired to each device, so that takes automatically care of the GND connection that is needed between Arduino and RPI.

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:20 pm

davidcoton wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:00 pm
Mains electricity can destroy your PI, burn your house or in the worst case kill you or your family.
  1. Please take drgeoff's advice and buy a properly designed PSU (5V1 4A is about right).
  2. If you must build one, first you must learn about mains wiring practices, then all the safety codes for your country. You should get a qualified electrician or electrical engineer to check your design, and then your construction, BEFORE you connect it to the mains. You should get the finished PSU professionally tested BEFORE you connect it to your PI. If you can't do any of this, see 1 above.
No responsible contributor here would think about trying to instruct you about mains safety over the forum, it is not a suitable subject for remote learning (because we cannot see what you are doing at each stage). Also, you cannot judge the competance of anyone who offers you a design for mains powered equipment. I would also caution against using any design you find on the web, since it may not meet your country's requirements. You still need a local qualified supervisor.
This post is absolutely right, if you are planning on making your own mains power supply. The RPF canot recommend/condone building your own supplies unless you are very experienced in the area.
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JohnsUPS
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sat Apr 27, 2019 2:32 am

As achrn said:
I have lots of power supplies that I didn't make. I wouldn't make a power supply now (though I have made linear supplies in the past) because switched mode units are now so plentiful and it makes much more sense just to buy one than build one.
......and this is the case with the 4A power supplies that I mentioned in the earlier post. I didn't make them. I'd have no problem building either a linear or switchmode power supply if necessary (as I am experienced designing with mains voltages), but there is no reason when suitable supplies can be had relatively cheap. Switchmode supplies are very common and easy to come by, so why bother to make one unless you need a custom design of some sort. Best advice is to purchase the supply that you need.

On the low voltage side, since you're only connecting the Pi and the Arduino (AFAICT), simply wire the 5V power supply connections on each board together in parallel. No need for a distribution board unless the power supply connections need to fan out to power additional peripherals. It then makes sense as the board makes wiring a bit neater and can be a place to mount power connectors, indicator LED's, or a filter cap or two.

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sat Apr 27, 2019 12:42 pm

JFYI, not all Arduinos use 5V logic. I have an MKR1000 that uses 3.3v logic. Which would be fine interfacing with a raspberry Pi all on its own.
Granted, it does appear that the Nano uses 5V logic and will require a level shifter.

tpylkko
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sat Apr 27, 2019 7:21 pm

I don't have time to look it up in the data sheet or whatever, but perhaps someone here already has...

But as far as a I know all the AVR processors (e.g Atmega328p) (which is what these older Arduino's use) can be run from 3.3.v (and even lower). So, unless there are some other parts on that nano that cannot be run at 3.3, it might be easier to just run the pi and Arduino both from a 3.3V source.

EDIT: posted at same time as above person. He/she however, is referring to a 32-bit Arduino which always run at 3.3V only. Nevertheless, the 8-bit AVR's can be run at various ranges. I don't know if Arduino makes this easy or if it is blocked/difficult.

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sat Apr 27, 2019 7:30 pm

From here https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/arduino-nano

The Arduino Nano can be powered via the Mini-B USB connection, 6-20V unregulated external power supply (pin 30), or 5V regulated external power supply (pin 27). The power source is automatically selected to the highest voltage source.

drgeoff
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sat Apr 27, 2019 10:05 pm

AIUI the ATMEGA chips which are used in various 5 volt Arduinos with a 16 MHz clock are not guaranteed to run at that frequency when powered at 3.3 volts. The 3.3 volt boards I have seen have 8 MHz crystals instead of 16 MHz.

For example https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Arduino-Pro- ... 2491625284

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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sat Apr 27, 2019 11:08 pm

I am far from any kind of Arduino expert, noob if I'm honest. I just happen to have a couple of Uno's which are 5V logic and an MKR1000 WIFI thats 3.3v logic. The MKR has the following warning that tipped me off that its 3.3V logic. Which prompted my earlier post.

Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKR1000 runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. While output to 5V digital devices is possible, bidirectional communication with 5V devices needs proper level shifting.

And under specs it says, Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V. You can power it at 5V via the USB port, just don't send 5V signals into its data pins.

I'm thinking serial over USB would be OK? And you could also power the Arduino that way. But I'm guessing there are down sides to doing that, restrictions on what you can actually do over USB.

tpylkko
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Sun Apr 28, 2019 9:24 am

Yes, you have to use a lower CPU frequency for lower voltage and when programming plain AVR chips in Arduino IDE, you can select the frequency from a menu. But I'm not sure if these options are exposed for the nano board

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:02 am

alphanumeric wrote:
Sat Apr 27, 2019 11:08 pm
I am far from any kind of Arduino expert, noob if I'm honest. I just happen to have a couple of Uno's which are 5V logic and an MKR1000 WIFI thats 3.3v logic. The MKR has the following warning that tipped me off that its 3.3V logic. Which prompted my earlier post.

Warning: Unlike most Arduino & Genuino boards, the MKR1000 runs at 3.3V. The maximum voltage that the I/O pins can tolerate is 3.3V. Applying voltages higher than 3.3V to any I/O pin could damage the board. While output to 5V digital devices is possible, bidirectional communication with 5V devices needs proper level shifting.

And under specs it says, Circuit Operating Voltage 3.3V. You can power it at 5V via the USB port, just don't send 5V signals into its data pins.

I'm thinking serial over USB would be OK? And you could also power the Arduino that way. But I'm guessing there are down sides to doing that, restrictions on what you can actually do over USB.
My Arduino Nano will already be Programmed just need to apply Power Source so If I am Providing 5V 3A DC to both RPi and Nano, It will work. As said Above by Sir, I need to use a bidirectional Level Shifter.

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:04 am

alphanumeric wrote:
Sat Apr 27, 2019 7:30 pm
From here https://shop.pimoroni.com/products/arduino-nano

The Arduino Nano can be powered via the Mini-B USB connection, 6-20V unregulated external power supply (pin 30), or 5V regulated external power supply (pin 27). The power source is automatically selected to the highest voltage source.
Sir, Just Need to Know about If we Supply 5V 3A Dc through the USB. It will not Effect or Burn the Nano. I am not going to use it's GPIO Pins to Provide Power Supply.

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:09 am

JohnsUPS wrote:
Sat Apr 27, 2019 2:32 am
As achrn said:
I have lots of power supplies that I didn't make. I wouldn't make a power supply now (though I have made linear supplies in the past) because switched mode units are now so plentiful and it makes much more sense just to buy one than build one.
......and this is the case with the 4A power supplies that I mentioned in the earlier post. I didn't make them. I'd have no problem building either a linear or switchmode power supply if necessary (as I am experienced designing with mains voltages), but there is no reason when suitable supplies can be had relatively cheap. Switchmode supplies are very common and easy to come by, so why bother to make one unless you need a custom design of some sort. The best advice is to purchase the supply that you need.

On the low voltage side, since you're only connecting the Pi and the Arduino (AFAICT), simply wire the 5V power supply connections on each board together in parallel. No need for a distribution board unless the power supply connections need to fan out to power additional peripherals. It then makes sense as the board makes wiring a bit neater and can be a place to mount power connectors, indicator LED's, or a filter cap or two.
Thank you So Much for your Suggestions and advice, Sir. Learned a Lot. I will buy one Power Supply which provides 5V/4A DC Output so It will be Fine if I provide Power Supply from it to Both of them. Now going to Learn how to provide it :D :D

Lucifer22334
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Re: Will Arduino nano and RPI get Damaged on Supplying 5V 3A DC?

Mon Apr 29, 2019 5:13 am

jamesh wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:20 pm
davidcoton wrote:
Fri Apr 26, 2019 3:00 pm
Mains electricity can destroy your PI, burn your house or in the worst case kill you or your family.
  1. Please take drgeoff's advice and buy a properly designed PSU (5V1 4A is about right).
  2. If you must build one, first you must learn about mains wiring practices, then all the safety codes for your country. You should get a qualified electrician or electrical engineer to check your design, and then your construction, BEFORE you connect it to the mains. You should get the finished PSU professionally tested BEFORE you connect it to your PI. If you can't do any of this, see 1 above.
No responsible contributor here would think about trying to instruct you about mains safety over the forum, it is not a suitable subject for remote learning (because we cannot see what you are doing at each stage). Also, you cannot judge the competance of anyone who offers you a design for mains powered equipment. I would also caution against using any design you find on the web, since it may not meet your country's requirements. You still need a local qualified supervisor.
This post is absolutely right if you are planning on making your own mains power supply. The RPF can't recommend/condone building your own supplies unless you are very experienced in the area.
Hi Jamesh, As you are a Raspberry Pi Organisation Engineer, Just asking you to be sure that if we Supply Arduino nano and Raspberry Pi 3 B + 5V/4A DC through USB it will not Burn Any of them.

And I am Not going to make any power supply Now. Just Going to Buy one. Thanks in Advance.

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