Kmort
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun May 21, 2017 10:36 pm

bee hive project

Wed May 24, 2017 3:41 pm

I am looking for someone to help point me in the right direction for starting a project... I bought a Pi zero w, because it was cheap and right in front of me; not really sure if that was the right model for me... In the end, I want to hook a bunch of sensors up to it to collect data in and around a bee hive. I am pretty sure that this idea has surfaced a ton before, but cant seem to find a well documented project of someone that has made it happen. I'm really new to Raspberry Pi projects; sorry for asking such a basic question! Thanks in advance for any help!

GordonTGopher
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Dec 01, 2012 11:25 am
Location: Letchworth Garden City

Re: bee hive project

Thu May 25, 2017 6:09 am

You might find something of use from the links here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/plan-bee/

Gordon

BMS Doug
Posts: 3824
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2014 2:42 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: bee hive project

Thu May 25, 2017 8:52 am

Kmort wrote:I am looking for someone to help point me in the right direction for starting a project... I bought a Pi zero w, because it was cheap and right in front of me; not really sure if that was the right model for me... In the end, I want to hook a bunch of sensors up to it to collect data in and around a bee hive. I am pretty sure that this idea has surfaced a ton before, but cant seem to find a well documented project of someone that has made it happen. I'm really new to Raspberry Pi projects; sorry for asking such a basic question! Thanks in advance for any help!

It may be harder to use a zero W for this than a Pi with built in GPIO header and USB ports but all of the zero's shortcomings can be worked around.

Main issues with the Pi zero format for someone who is new to the Pi:

only 1 USB port (micro sized) - harder to plug in keyboard and mouse.
Workarounds: Bluetooth keyboard and mouse or USB hub or connect by network.

No GPIO pins: making it harder to prototype, it is possible to solder wires to the pins you need to use but if you are unfamiliar with using a pi you probably want to move things around, which is much less convenient.
Workarounds: solder on a 40 pin header or (Easy) add a hammer header or (Hard) solder on a 40 pin ribbon cable.

Often the simplest solution is to use a Pi with more features for the prototyping and then move the finished design to the Pi zero W.
Doug.
Building Management Systems Engineer.

Kmort
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun May 21, 2017 10:36 pm

Re: bee hive project

Thu May 25, 2017 4:23 pm

BMS Doug wrote:
Kmort wrote:I am looking for someone to help point me in the right direction for starting a project... I bought a Pi zero w, because it was cheap and right in front of me; not really sure if that was the right model for me... In the end, I want to hook a bunch of sensors up to it to collect data in and around a bee hive. I am pretty sure that this idea has surfaced a ton before, but cant seem to find a well documented project of someone that has made it happen. I'm really new to Raspberry Pi projects; sorry for asking such a basic question! Thanks in advance for any help!

It may be harder to use a zero W for this than a Pi with built in GPIO header and USB ports but all of the zero's shortcomings can be worked around.

Main issues with the Pi zero format for someone who is new to the Pi:

only 1 USB port (micro sized) - harder to plug in keyboard and mouse.
Workarounds: Bluetooth keyboard and mouse or USB hub or connect by network.

No GPIO pins: making it harder to prototype, it is possible to solder wires to the pins you need to use but if you are unfamiliar with using a pi you probably want to move things around, which is much less convenient.
Workarounds: solder on a 40 pin header or (Easy) add a hammer header or (Hard) solder on a 40 pin ribbon cable.

Often the simplest solution is to use a Pi with more features for the prototyping and then move the finished design to the Pi zero W.
So, what I am hearing is that I should find another project that is using a different model, follow that project step by step, and then try to port it? If that is the case, what is the best way to find a well documented bee hive project that I can repeat?

BMS Doug
Posts: 3824
Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2014 2:42 pm
Location: London, UK

Re: bee hive project

Fri May 26, 2017 7:23 am

Kmort wrote: So, what I am hearing is that I should find another project that is using a different model, follow that project step by step, and then try to port it? If that is the case, what is the best way to find a well documented bee hive project that I can repeat?
There are quite a few out there, try this one.
Doug.
Building Management Systems Engineer.

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