lewmur
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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 4:58 pm

Burngate wrote:
lewmur wrote:...Personally, my solution would be an "event app" supplied to each Pi participant, furnished by the event sponsor, that would "phone home" to the sponsor with unique ID, every so often. In order for the participent to remove their Pi without setting off an alarm, they'd have to get prior permission of some sort from the sponsor. The "event app" would be written specifically for each event and not given out until the event itself so no one would be able to "hack" it ahead of time.
That app would have to be very carefully written.
I'm thinking of RiscOS, or someone's bare-metal Pi, without Linux.
Why would it have to be carefully written? It is a one time, throw away app, written for the event. It isn't as if the thief would have the time to find, examine and hack the app while standing in front of dozens of people at the event. Again, we aren't talking about general security here but rather about people who furnish their Pi's for a public event and having someone reach over when no one is looking, unplugging the Pi and sticking in their pocket.

I'm not talking about dealing with a master crimminal/expert hacker. I'm talking about protecting against the casual thief who "spots his chance."
Last edited by lewmur on Fri Jul 27, 2012 5:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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alexeames
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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 5:09 pm

lewmur wrote:That's assuming the theif is an idiot. All it would take to avoid any protection software like that would be to erase and re-image the SD Card prior to booting it the first time.
Firstly I think most people who would steal in this environment are lazy idiots, almost by definition. Look at the people who steal ipads and iphones and then end up with their photos plastered all over the web because they didn't think to check what apps were installed!

Secondly I'm well aware that reimaging the card will get rid of it (I think the rest of my post talked about that and why Jim suggested something embedded in the kernel didn't it?)

Thirdly - let's see your event app then. :evil:
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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 5:16 pm

alexeames wrote:
lewmur wrote:That's assuming the theif is an idiot. All it would take to avoid any protection software like that would be to erase and re-image the SD Card prior to booting it the first time.
Firstly I think most people who would steal in this environment are lazy idiots, almost by definition. Look at the people who steal ipads and iphones and then end up with their photos plastered all over the web because they didn't think to check what apps were installed!

Secondly I'm well aware that reimaging the card will get rid of it (I think the rest of my post talked about that and why Jim suggested something embedded in the kernel didn't it?)

Thirdly - let's see your event app then. :evil:
It wouldn't be MY event app. The whole theory rest on the assumption that the event sponsor would write a "one time" app just for one event. Any "generic app" written for all events, would be hacked as soon as it was published. As would any "kernel patch".

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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 5:19 pm

Jim Manley wrote: kibitzers are welcome to watch, but, don't criticize anything unless you have a proven solution appropriate to the Pi in-hand. That's not to say we don't welcome input - that would be ridiculously arrogant and stupid - just don't flame someone else's work unless you have something demonstrably better that actually works. Please save the hand-waving for the opening and closing ceremonies at the Olympics :D
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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:13 pm

khh wrote:The best solution would probably be to make a battery-powered beeper and have it beep unless it's given power on a particular GPIO pin. Then have a program in the Pi turn off that pin when ethernet is disconnected.

That way your Raspberry will start squealing if someone disconnects the ethernet, the power or the beeper, with the added benefit of immediately knowing where the affected pi is. Only way to foil the beeper would be to cut the wire to the speaker or battery but this could be circumvented by making a simple, wooden cabinet.

This actually sounds like a fun project... I think I'll make me one of these.
That sounds rather like a gadget I built when I was in college in the late 1960s...in a small, closed, aluminum chassis, there was a 30v battery, a Mallory SonAlert, an SCR (and associated current limiting resistor), and switch. Flip the switch and the (slightly overdriven) SonAlert goes off and you can't disable it unless you stick a straightened paper-clip in a small hole and do a momentary short on the SCR. It was called a "Panic Button". (It also had a fake AC power cord, which was just tied off inside. The first thing anyone who triggered it did was to flip the switch. The second thing they did--since throwing the switch had no effect--was to unplug it. That didn't work, either.)

The "Pi Protector" could be built that way. All you'd need would a pair of pins that will cause a momentary pulse on the SCR gate when disconnected. Probably have to have an "arming" switch when hooking it up....If the arming switch is a key switch, then it could be used to turn the device off before a legitimate disconnect.

Believe me that when a SonAlert gets 30v input, NO ONE will be able to ignore it. (IIRC, that puts it at around the 120dB range.)

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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:30 pm

When Jim first brought this topic up, I got to thinking about, simple cheap physical security. 100% tehft proof? No. Idiot proof? Maybe.... Casual theft proof? Maybe...

Take a chunk of wood, say 16" to 18" of pine 1x6. Drill two holes in it that will just clear the sides of whatever case your Pi is in (or just clear the sides of the PCB if you're going to run without a case. Cut a groove in the underside of the board from one hole to the other (this is to help it sit flat on a table and can be ignored if you don't care about that).

Use a cable tie to secure the Pi (with or without case) to the board, placing the cable tie between connectors that stick out (so the Pi can't be just slipped out).

If you need any auxiliary devices (e.g. HDMI-to-VGA converter), put in more holes for cable ties for those devices.

For increasing levels of security.... Add a provision for a second cable tie at 90 degrees from the first one. Tape all cables to the board, tape the board to the table, add an alarm unit (see my previous post).

Most convenient of all (for us...not for a potential thief), the board can be set up ahead of time. For extra convenience, attach a breaker bar to the board as well. That way all the cables could be hooked up at the power-and-Pi ends making general hookup faster.

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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:32 pm

Good ideas.

Heres some of my random security ideas:

One solution would be to have a video camera watching the table and the output displayed on a big monitor so potential theives know they are being watched - this could form part of a display to draw in punters - provided theives are unable to steal the camera and monitor (unless it is a hidden camera).

A simpler solution would be to have jumper wires running off the Pi's gnd and 3.3/5v GPIO pins connected to a simple circuit which causes a loud alarm to sound when the pi's are disconnected. This could be bolted to the underside of the table.

Simpler still - thread somethng through the centre of the tv out...(!)

A scary big brother solution could be for future distros to require users to enter their board serial number or for it to be automatically detected. This could occasionally be broadcast via the internet for checking against a voluntary register of Pi users. Stolen Pi users could then be shamed via a message or have their distro locked. Not sure about that idea though - needs more thought...

I had my bicycle stolen a week ago - it was securely D-locked so the theives must have used a well known but unpublishable trick. By definition, successful theives aren't stupid, so be careful.
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Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 7:58 pm

Jim, for your next PiJama party just use a low tech hack. You must have heard that old how-to-catch-a-monkey story! Just build a plexiglass "cocoanut" that allows a modern monkey with a defective impulse control gene to play with the pi but not remove it from its container!

Max

Re: SecuriPi

Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:40 pm

Rabjerg wrote:I threw together a simple design, using a 3mm aluminum plate, some cutting and bending.
And you have a "theft proof" and cooled case.
This is the base design, then you can add stuff like a eye for a big chain and a badger, or screw some covers to the base plate to cover the usb's in case you want those secure.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/dhz3c1916dmeoy2/securipi.png
https://www.dropbox.com/s/c4jmz8rn8v2xzti/securipi2.png
https://www.dropbox.com/s/cnp76hi90m7scl9/securipi3.png
Like the concept.
Perhaps you could add a Kensington hole, so that cheap $ 3 laptop chains can be used.

http://www.kensington.com/kensington/us ... -slot.aspx
http://www.dealextreme.com/p/laptop-pc- ... -44?item=6

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:07 am

bredman wrote: This could be easily done by putting a cable tie around the Ethernet jack, just under the locking tab. This is an old trick used by IT support departments to stop idiots from unplugging cables.

It won't stop anybody with a knife or snips, but it would stop the opportunistic thief. Note that you would only need to lock the RPi end of the cable, it is a little difficult to put an RPi in your pocket if there is an Ethernet cable hanging out of it.
I like that one. Just make sure the cable is not short and hub/router is not accessable. I see someone walking around with a knife or snips out he better be able to eat them! QUICK! because they may end up plugging in where he thought they would not fit.
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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:29 am

Thanks for all of the inputs, everyone. I'm really leaning toward Lob0246's thermite-in-the-thief's-pocket suggestion ... it just provides SO much more entertainment and satisfaction value, not to mention making a lasting impression on the perp, quite literally! The only downsides would be the ensuing clouds of rapidly-overheated cockroach fumes, as well as the need to keep Purple K chemical fire extinguishers handy in the very likely event that someone accidentally sets off the thermite slab over their Pi! I hate when that happens!

I was mostly interested in stirring some outside-the-box thinking (to make it possible for visitors to still see the Pi and handle it, if at all possible) for solutions, with the software-oriented approaches providing the surprise factor for embarrassing someone foolish enough to try to snatch a Pi. The best solution is the one that's most unexpected, and that generally means attacking the problem on as many fronts as possible. Any combination of the suggestions up to this point will be better than the current situation of bare-naked boards with no anti-theft software running.

The people who have keyed on preventing casual theft are on precisely the right track - this doesn't need to be world-class bulletproof under all envisionable circumstances (e.g., surviving more than 10 seconds at BlackHat/DefCon). It's more a matter of providing multiple mechanisms to cause an unpleasant surprise for lazy idiots who probably don't even know what Linux is, much less what /proc/cpuinfo means. BTW, that's a file, and if you can get root access, you can munge it, as I'm guessing it's populated during boot. I was curious as to whether there's a system call we can make independent of any software to get to the actual serial number burned into the SOC.

[quote=markb]Why not use a bit of common sense when leaving a Pi out in public until they become easily available?[/quote]
This is the kind of unhelpful comment I'm glad none of the others made. We were set up on the only table in the middle of a small conference room that people had to be escorted into through over 500 feet of building space, and we only had a few dozen visitors (about a third of which were kids) all afternoon, most of whom actively contributed to the event by bringing equipment, helping set up, etc. The stolen Pi was taken from a machine crowded around nearly the entire day by kids enjoying programming, trying out games, and otherwise doing exactly what we wanted to have happen, all within line-of-sight of other participants, including me, less than eight feet away. It wasn't like we just laid it out on a table 100 feet away in front of thousands of passers-by and ignored it. It appears that it disappeared during tear-down, which is always chaotic, and I had assumed that someone had just put the board in the wrong box. It's still possible that someone who doesn't monitor these forums doesn't even know that it's missing and that they need to check what's in with what they brought. I'm still hoping against hope that's actually the case. However, others have had thefts occur previously (but, didn't advertise it - grrrRRR).

The physical securing route is likely the most straightforward, from Liz's duct tape (it's like The Force, there's a dark side, a light side, and it holds the universe together :) ), to the cable-ties (is there a vanadium/chromium/molybdenum/steel version of those?), to a big, transparent plastic case that a number of boards can be protected within (might help to keep cables neat, too), to whips and chains, to ...

Very interesting point that the composite video jack is open all the way through the center conductor hole - it's certainly large enough in diameter to string one of the thinner security cables through (maybe even vinyl-covered), although it might need to have a bolt-hole tab swaged onto the end of the cable after being passed through the jack. I was going to use a high-intensity light to look through the six-layers of the PC board to see if a big enough hole could be drilled through, but, the jack center conductor hole is probably larger in diameter than any point where the board could safely and accurately be drilled.

The false-alarm heartbeat issue is fairly easy to manage with the right frequency of timing and keeping the protocol as absolutely light/simple as possible. It's pretty straightforward to monitor network traffic and adjust both the frequency of heartbeat transmissions as well as expectations of how often they should be received. Think of it as a variation of the back-off algorithm used when network packet collisions occur - the next attempt is delayed by some multiplier faction, plus a random offset to reduce the likelihood of a collision on the next attempt.

I'm a little bit surprised at the tin-foil-hat response to putting something in the kernels - there's already a ton of security stuff in there, including the code that populates /proc/cpuinfo (if not for security, which includes license validation that's not used on the Pi as far as I'm aware, why else is it in there?). Why in the world would you be opposed to helping to prevent theft of the hardware, especially given the intended purpose of the board - education of kids. Otherwise-sane people keep leaping off tall buildings in a single bound and splattering themselves in intellectual embarrassment on the pavement below - how many times do we have to repeat that the Pi is not meant to be everything to everyone. Also, note that even the rumor of hidden security/identity features will spread very quickly through the thief underground and often even just the impression that boards are being actively monitored and secured via multiple countermeasures can be enough of a deterrent. Typical door locks are meant to keep honest people honest and make it not worth the trouble for casual criminals to take a risk. Massive concrete-and-steel vaults are only appropriate to slow down the most determined teams of expert break-in-and-make-off technicians.

If you don't like the Pi board's intended purpose and everything that would help ensure its success (educating kids, which implies continuous availability to them), then don't buy it, don't use it, don't put your personal info on it (including embarrassing material, finances, intimate communications, etc.), and don't complain about it. I sure as heck don't put any personal info on the SD cards used in my Pi boards, and one of those was also stolen with my Pi, which is actually worth more to me than the board because of hard work I had done on custom software on it (although I had almost completely backed it up, anyway).

I'm going to go consult some Harry Houdini books to reverse-engineer how to most effectively secure a Pi in a steamer trunk, wrap it in chains, lower it into a tank of highly-corrosive (and especially stinky) chemicals, and prevent it from being liberated not one moment before I'm ready for it to be, all while ensuring that the Pi emerges unscathed into my waiting hands.
The best things in life aren't things ... but, a Pi comes pretty darned close! :D
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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:46 am

Ahhh @Jim Manley you should really look into mal-oderant technologies. That stuff is flat purid. You do not get used to it either. When they lift the Pi it bursts a packet. You will be able to track them without a blood hound. That stuff does not wash off easily either.

Or just Zip Tie the dang RasPii to a table (holes through the table).
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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:59 am

Jim Manley wrote:I'm a little bit surprised at the tin-foil-hat response to putting something in the kernels - there's already a ton of security stuff in there, including the code that populates /proc/cpuinfo (if not for security, which includes license validation that's not used on the Pi as far as I'm aware, why else is it in there?). Why in the world would you be opposed to helping to prevent theft of the hardware, especially given the intended purpose of the board - education of kids.
We are so watched, photographed and monitored, it's a little uncomfortable to think that every Pi should have something built into the kernel to enable it to be located in the event of theft. I guess you've worked in the "security services" for a long time that this seems normal.

To me, it's the kind of feature that should be optional (which by definition would make it less useful or foolproof). I accept it's the only way of ensuring that all Pis could be tracked. But the question is do we need all Pis to be tracked? I think the answer is no. Obviously you have suffered the loss of Pi recently Jim, but there really shouldn't be any need to go to such lengths as getting the foundation to incorporate some tracking code into the kernel of all Pis because a few go missing at public events. Seriously - it's a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

I think physical security is a much better bet and much easier to do. For those wanting a switchable software solution, I also give you pifind - a silly little python script that emails you the output of ifconfig and cpuinfo on every boot...

Code: Select all

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7
import smtplib, string, subprocess
# pifind.py gets the system parameters you want to know and 
# emails them through gmail to a destination of your choice
# INSTALLING pifind
# Add this line to /etc/rc.local
#   python /home/pi/pifind.py
# And place this file, pifind.py in your /home/pi folder, then
#   sudo chmod 755 /home/pi/pifind.py

output_if = subprocess.Popen(['ifconfig'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()[0]
get_cpu = open('/proc/cpuinfo', 'r')
output_cpu = get_cpu.read()
get_cpu.close()
      
fromaddr = 'youremail@googlemail.com'  
toaddr  = 'youremail@domain.com'  

BODY = string.join((
        "From: %s" % fromaddr,
        "To: %s" % toaddr,
        "Subject: Your RasPi just booted",
        "",
        output_if,
        output_cpu,
        ), "\r\n")
     
# Login details
username = 'yourgoogleID'  
password = 'yourgooglepwd'  
      
# send the email  
server = smtplib.SMTP('smtp.gmail.com:587')  
server.starttls()  
server.login(username,password)  
server.sendmail(fromaddr, toaddr, BODY)  
server.quit()
Of course, the code could easily be buried somewhere other than /home/pi. I put it there for simplicity at this stage. I had fun with this and learned at least three new procedures in python. Comments on the code, which I welcome, :D would probably be better by PM so as not to take the thread off topic. I'm almost certain I've coded things in a "wrong", "sub-optimal", "poor styled", "inefficient" etc. way - I did this for fun and learning - may not be using it routinely. :D

But in the spirit of the thread, I've criticised an idea AND provided a working solution :lol:
Alex Eames RasPi.TV, RasP.iO

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 6:24 am

Jim Manley wrote: I was mostly interested in stirring some outside-the-box thinking (to make it possible for visitors to still see the Pi and handle it, if at all possible) for solutions, with the software-oriented approaches providing the surprise factor for embarrassing someone foolish enough to try to snatch a Pi. The best solution is the one that's most unexpected, and that generally means attacking the problem on as many fronts as possible. Any combination of the suggestions up to this point will be better than the current situation of bare-naked boards with no anti-theft software running.
A cable running to a switch that activates the sort of alarm box I described previously would allow a Pi to be seen and handled, as long as the cable (the "leash" being either electronic or physical) isn't disconnected. I'll grant that a physical alarm disconnect has the advantage that the Pi could be shut down and all other cables unplugged without firing an active alarm...or maybe that's a disadvantage... One could, of course have both an electronic and a physical "leash".
Very interesting point that the composite video jack is open all the way through the center conductor hole - it's certainly large enough in diameter to string one of the thinner security cables through (maybe even vinyl-covered), although it might need to have a bolt-hole tab swaged onto the end of the cable after being passed through the jack.
Would a bicycle brake cable fit through it? If so, they generally come with a secure block on one end and you'd just have to decide how to secure the other end....Preferably, I think, to something reasonably bulky.
The false-alarm heartbeat issue is fairly easy to manage with the right frequency of timing and keeping the protocol as absolutely light/simple as possible. It's pretty straightforward to monitor network traffic and adjust both the frequency of heartbeat transmissions as well as expectations of how often they should be received. Think of it as a variation of the back-off algorithm used when network packet collisions occur - the next attempt is delayed by some multiplier faction, plus a random offset to reduce the likelihood of a collision on the next attempt.
For the Next Si Valley Jam, I have a Shuttle system with WinXP on it. I can bring that to use as a monitoring system. If you don't want to use XP, it could run either a Live CD or it could be wiped and converted to a Linux system (which I'm considering doing anyway). In either case, it's small enough to transport easily (I have a Shuttle carrying case for it), yet big enough that it won't fit in a pocket. If some one wants to write a monitoring program, I'm willing to make the hardware available so there is something to run it on that won't take a Pi out of circulation.

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 7:51 am

For the heartbeat solution I think I'd do something like this:

Code: Select all

Central Server:
    - Listen to UDP port for keep-alive
    - Listen to TCP port (with SSL) for association
    - Broadcast UPD every x seconds with updated randomly generated, time restricted string (TID)
    - on keep-alive, validate and update internal logic
Pi:
    - Listen to UPD for broadcast with new TID
    - Send UPD keep-alive every y (y < x) seconds
Association:
    1: Pi gets disassociation password (DPASS) from user
    2: Pi generates random identifying string (PID)
    3: Pi listens to UPD for broadcast
    4: Pi connects with TCP (with SSL) and sends DPASS and PID
    5: Server adds Pi to internal logic and sends back a TEST message
    6: Pi sends a UPD keep-alive
    7: Server waits for keep-alive and sends back OK, ERROR or TIMEOUT depending on keep-alive
    8: Pi disconnects TCP
    9: Pi forgets DPASS
    10: Pi enters normal operation mode
Disassosiation:
    1: Pi asks user for DPASS
    2: Pi connects with TCP (with SSL) and requests disassociation, supplying DPASS)
    3: Server removes Pi from internal logic and sends back an OK message
keep-alive format:
    sha512(TID . PID)
Then when a new TID should be generated, the server could check all internal values to see how long each pi has been absent, and do whatever is appropriate.

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 8:36 am

alexeames wrote:We are so watched, photographed and monitored, it's a little uncomfortable to think that every Pi should have something built into the kernel to enable it to be located in the event of theft. I guess you've worked in the "security services" for a long time that this seems normal.

To me, it's the kind of feature that should be optional (which by definition would make it less useful or foolproof). I accept it's the only way of ensuring that all Pis could be tracked. But the question is do we need all Pis to be tracked? I think the answer is no. Obviously you have suffered the loss of Pi recently Jim, but there really shouldn't be any need to go to such lengths as getting the foundation to incorporate some tracking code into the kernel of all Pis because a few go missing at public events. Seriously - it's a sledgehammer to crack a nut.
Hi Alex,

Thanks for putting the effort into your response. I'll incorporate your idea into the multi-pronged citadel of physical and software defenses. To give you a feel for why this has me so hot under the collar, try the following. Gather the cash it takes to actually acquire a Pi (include shipping, tax, and an extra-high amount for the frustration in waiting over five months) and give it to a child. Then, a stranger you invited into your home, looked you in the eye and shook your hand, proceeds to pick the pocket of the child just before they leave. The child discovers the money is missing after-the-fact, which was going to be used to buy their favorite book that just happened to be Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica. Now, they'll never know the joys of differential and integral calculus, they won't get into college, they'll wind up in a minimum-wage, dead-end job and, in frustration, they turn to a life of stealing and fencing Pi boards for pennies by the time there are millions in the wild. For the want of a nail, a shoe is lost ... Back in the 1980s, violent crime in New York City was out of control and still rising fast, and the mayor decided to prosecute every criminal infraction regardless of how serious it was. Violent crime is now down over 90% since then because when people think they can get away with small stuff, they inevitably move up to trying to get away with bigger crimes, and it just snowballs.

This has nothing to do with working in security services (I've spent the last 18 years as a software engineer in commercial startup companies in Silicon Valley), this has to do with stealing opportunities from kids, and I will not stand for it, even if it is a ~$50 computer (delivered, no case). I believe it has been a mistake to position the Pi as anything other than an educational tool, because then it's not valued for its true potential and some feel no compunction for ripping them off. If you think the few boards that have been taken are all that will disappear, go to a school in a poor area and ask how long anything lasts before it's stolen for whatever it can be sold for on the street. What we're seeing now is just the tip of the iceberg to come unless the Pi becomes as ubiquitous as pencils in classrooms (and as cheap).
The best things in life aren't things ... but, a Pi comes pretty darned close! :D
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In theory, theory & practice are the same - in practice, they aren't!!!

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:40 am

Don't forget that the sd card can just be whipped out and another (possibly hacked) distro inserted, so I'm not sure a software solution is even possible - come to think of it if you physically secure the boards then the SD Card is still stealable - perhaps there is a market here for a case that can be bolted down like a previous poster has designed.

Is it too late to incorporate holes in the model A's board?

I like the cable-tie/ethernet solution - simple and ingenious!

Would some kind of cable tie also fit through the TV out? If so then maybe a row of pis could be strung on one security cable via a single tie or chain of ties to each one so it is still free to move....?

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:11 pm

Jim Manley wrote:It's more a matter of providing multiple mechanisms to cause an unpleasant surprise for lazy idiots who probably don't even know what Linux is, much less what /proc/cpuinfo means. BTW, that's a file, and if you can get root access, you can munge it, as I'm guessing it's populated during boot.
/proc (and /sys too) is a virtual filesystem, not 'real' files that can be edited ;)
Jim Manley wrote:I was curious as to whether there's a system call we can make independent of any software to get to the actual serial number burned into the SOC.
Coincidentally: http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewt ... 79#p134379 :D

While it's obviously awful that you Pi has been stolen Jim, ISTR in one of Eben's interviews he said that part of the reason for keeping the cost so low was so that it wouldn't be attractive to thieves, and even if it was stolen it would be easy to replace. But that'll obviously only become true when the current order-backlog has cleared :(
pygmy_giant wrote:Is it too late to incorporate holes in the model A's board?
As the ModelA won't include an ethernet jack, that'll leave a couple of small (non-conductive) holes in that space :)

EDIT: Which of course means that any "software solutions" won't work on the ModelA ;)
Last edited by AndrewS on Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bredman
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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:23 pm

lewmur wrote:
Burngate wrote: That app would have to be very carefully written.
I'm thinking of RiscOS, or someone's bare-metal Pi, without Linux.
Why would it have to be carefully written?
It would have to be very carefully written to allow for somebody who does not use a standard Linux distribution or who does not use Linux at all. Remember there are people who use things like RiscOS or DexOS who might like to display at a Jam.

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AndrewS
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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:40 pm

bredman wrote:It would have to be very carefully written to allow for somebody who does not use a standard Linux distribution or who does not use Linux at all. Remember there are people who use things like RiscOS or DexOS who might like to display at a Jam.
Surely any such app would need to be specifically compiled (if not re-written) separately for Linux/RiscOS/DexOS? I believe they all have different ABIs thus can't run each others' programs.

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:28 pm

AndrewS wrote:
bredman wrote:It would have to be very carefully written to allow for somebody who does not use a standard Linux distribution or who does not use Linux at all. Remember there are people who use things like RiscOS or DexOS who might like to display at a Jam.
Surely any such app would need to be specifically compiled (if not re-written) separately for Linux/RiscOS/DexOS? I believe they all have different ABIs thus can't run each others' programs.
Surely any such app written in a language like python could easily be compiled for any OS.

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rurwin
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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 4:37 pm

Only if you have previously ported Python to DexOS. That is a significant effort, particularly so since DexOS-the-person is probably very uninterested in doing it.

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:42 pm

pygmy_giant wrote:...perhaps there is a market here for a case that can be bolted down like a previous poster has designed.
If you look at the middle picture here: https://www.modmypi.com/shop/raspberry- ... case-white you can see that there are holes in the bottom of the case. One could put screws through those holes into something too large to fit in a pocket. That *won't*--of course--prevent someone from opening the case and removing the Pi, but if it slows the "opportunist" down enough, it would provide some light weight security, and I think that's really the point Jim is reaching for. Make theft take long enough that alert observers will have time to step in.

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:47 pm

AndrewS wrote: While it's obviously awful that you Pi has been stolen Jim, ISTR in one of Eben's interviews he said that part of the reason for keeping the cost so low was so that it wouldn't be attractive to thieves, and even if it was stolen it would be easy to replace. But that'll obviously only become true when the current order-backlog has cleared :(
Is there *anything* that is so cheap that it won't be stolen?

While it's nice to think that a $35 computer is too cheap to bother stealing, given the rate at which offices "lose" pens, pencils and paper clips, I am dubious of the initial contention.

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Re: SecuriPi

Sat Jul 28, 2012 5:55 pm

Jim Manley wrote: The physical securing route is likely the most straightforward, from Liz's duct tape (it's like The Force, there's a dark side, a light side, and it holds the universe together :) ), to the cable-ties (is there a vanadium/chromium/molybdenum/steel version of those?), to a big, transparent plastic case that a number of boards can be protected within (might help to keep cables neat, too), to whips and chains, to .
There's this: http://gizmodo.com/5353104/steel-velcro ... es-celsius

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