jamesh
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Wed Apr 11, 2012 8:40 am

But still no evidence on what the problem being solved is - or did I miss that bit?
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danielverza
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:58 am

I'm also not sure what the OP intended with this topic !

I'm guessing he's trying to say he has cross-compiled a basic Slitaz to run on the Pi (on ARMv6 at least)

@alanyih: You *really* need to work on your communication skills !

hippy
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:19 am

alanyih said:

3. boot
# qemu-system-arm -m 256 -M versatilepb -cpu arm1176 -kernel slitaz_emergency.img &
This is what's confused me; qemu is an emulator, so I'm guessing we have an ARM image which can be "booted" and run using qemu, but I don't understand what is meant by "standalone Raspberry Pi" ?

I think it's the somewhat enigmatic and cryptic nature of the information which is confusing. "Here's an image that runs via qemu and emulates an R-Pi environment. Get the image from <here>, run it with <this> command" ( if that's the case ) would have been much easier to immediately comprehend.

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piglet
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Wed Apr 11, 2012 2:28 pm

This thread made my eyes bleed.

I'm glad to see experienced users being puzzled - this is the sort of thread that helps keep people on M$ Windows.

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jojopi
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Wed Apr 11, 2012 2:56 pm

hippy said:

This is what's confused me; qemu is an emulator, so I'm guessing we have an ARM image which can be "booted" and run using qemu, but I don't understand what is meant by "standalone Raspberry Pi" ?
The "Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi" text is borrowed from /etc/init.d/rcS in the Cambridge reference image's kernel_emergency initramfs.  It refers to the fact that there is no block device backing the root filesystem, which is also true in the slitaz port.  This is important if you want to run e2fsck.static against your card for instance.

Obviously the slitaz image would need to be combined with the GPU firmware in a FAT filesystem, and probably built with different kernel options, in order to boot on a physical Pi instead of in qemu.

jamesh
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Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:02 pm

And.....I still have no idea what this thread is about. Will somebody please think of the children?
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alanyih
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:56 pm

hippy said:


alanyih said:


3. boot



# qemu-system-arm -m 256 -M versatilepb -cpu arm1176 -kernel slitaz_emergency.img &


"Here's an image that runs via qemu and emulates an R-Pi environment. Get the image from <here>, run it with <this> command" ( if that's the case ) would have been much easier to immediately comprehend.
That's it.

alanyih
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:57 pm

jojopi said:


hippy said:


This is what's confused me; qemu is an emulator, so I'm guessing we have an ARM image which can be "booted" and run using qemu, but I don't understand what is meant by "standalone Raspberry Pi" ?


The "Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi" text is borrowed from /etc/init.d/rcS in the Cambridge reference image's kernel_emergency initramfs.  It refers to the fact that there is no block device backing the root filesystem, which is also true in the slitaz port.  This is important if you want to run e2fsck.static against your card for instance.

Obviously the slitaz image would need to be combined with the GPU firmware in a FAT filesystem, and probably built with different kernel options, in order to boot on a physical Pi instead of in qemu.



yes.

Thankx.

alanyih
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Re: Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:06 pm

alanyih said:


Greetings from standalone Raspberry Pi

1. slitaz_emergency.img is based on kernel_emergency.img
Additional files supplied by the foundation
http://elinux.org/RPi_Advanced.....foundation

kernel_emergency.img : kernel with busybox rootfs. You can use this to repair the main linux partition using e2fsck if the linux partition gets corrupted.


kernel_emergency.img used in Rescue Mode

Ref:

Chapter 3. Rescue Mode

http://www.centos.org/docs/2/r.....emode.html

When things go wrong, there are ways to fix problems. However, these methods require that you understand the system well. This chapter will describe the ways that you can boot into rescue mode and single user mode, where you can use your own knowledge to repair the system.

What is Rescue Mode?

Rescue mode provides the ability to boot a small Linux environment entirely from a diskette, CD-ROM, or using some other method.

As the name implies, rescue mode is provided to rescue you from something. During normal operation, your Red Hat Linux system uses files located on your system's hard drive to do everything — run programs, store your files, and more.

However, there may be times when you are unable to get Linux running completely enough to access its files on your system's hard drive. Using rescue mode, you can access the files stored on your system's hard drive, even if you cannot actually run Linux from that hard drive.

Normally, you will need to get into rescue mode for one of two reasons:

You are unable to boot Linux.

You are having hardware or software problems, and you want to get a few important files off your system's hard drive.
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