Narishma
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2011 1:29 pm

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Fri Oct 05, 2012 12:12 pm

fjb wrote:If you want development efficiency then and IDE is a good idea as you can also configure the tools involved. If you've been programming as long as I have then an IDE saves time :)
It's just a matter of personal preference.

halhertani
Posts: 40
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2012 5:02 am
Location: Ottawa, ON Canada
Contact: Website

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:42 pm

For a native command line based development environment you can use the native GCC on the RPi along with vi, vim or nano.

For GUI based native development, you can use either Geany or QTCreator on the RPI along with native GCC. I had success with both though QTCreator was a not as responsive as Geany. QtCreator is a lot more powerful though...

I did not try Emacs on the RPi but that may be another good way to go

You could also develop for the RPi from your desktop using a GNU C/C++ Cross Compiler + Eclipse Development Environment

http://hertaville.com/2012/09/28/develo ... -compiler/

rasp87
Posts: 94
Joined: Thu Jun 27, 2013 7:02 am

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Sun Nov 03, 2013 8:30 am

I thought if I read this thread I'll get an answer for the original question. But, what I'm seeing is some people talking about whether to use an IDE at all or not. Well, this is definitely an interesting topic, but don't you think you had better open a new thread for it and just answer the asked question here?
Now, what are the good (and rather light-weight IDEs) for pi development?

ffelagund
Posts: 30
Joined: Wed Nov 21, 2012 7:53 pm

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 9:00 am

From my personal point of view (learnt in past projects), the most productive way to develop for RPi is Visual Studio + plink (ssh commands) + makefiles. This will make coding very agine and fast although debugging must be done on RPi direct using gdb (or similar), or a propietary plugin for VStudio that integrates GDB in to the IDE itself.

rasp87
Posts: 94
Joined: Thu Jun 27, 2013 7:02 am

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Mon Nov 04, 2013 11:57 am

ffelagund wrote:From my personal point of view (learnt in past projects), the most productive way to develop for RPi is Visual Studio + plink (ssh commands) + makefiles.
I don't know if I exactly got your point or not. Do you mean writing the code in VS and compilation and building on the pi or cross-compiling from VS? Please clarify.

blamarpa
Posts: 454
Joined: Thu May 23, 2013 4:02 pm
Location: España

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Fri Nov 08, 2013 1:58 am

I am a total beginer in c. I learmed assembly lenguaje in a 6502 and latter in a pc, Cobol, a few lines in Pascal and a lot of Basic (from the IBM bios basic to VB, coding a lot of in Access). Electronics is my hobby and always wanted to return to the basics as when i captured the printer interruption on a Pc using assembly to open a cash with a darlington conected to it in my first cobol program for a friend's shop in 1985.
Now my son is in his first grade at university and have to learm c, so i am learmint it too. We where talking, one or two hours, about interpreted and compiled lenguajes, linkers, libraryes, etc. he tolds me that they are using codeblocks so in my pi i wrote "sudo apt-get install codeblocks" and voila! only half an hour latter our first program was writed, compiled and running in the raspberry. One hour later, after download wiringpi, the "for" sentence is making tree led blink and the nigth caugth us with a pretty led simulating a candle using random loops.
Also tested to debug it after viewing one video about codeblocks in youtube. All in our raspberry pi!
this weekend, i hope, my darlingtons transistors will be driving two motors in a vehicle tha my yougest son is building.
So, yes, you can code with vi but what do we want? (now) develope and teach with all the simpliciy but using a powerfull lenguaje. Of couse i have to explain tihngs like why canddle.o is not the same when candle.c is compiled in a pc or in an arm, how to tell codeblocks where is wiringpi library (we compiled it without codebloks and have seen wath is inside) but now, with that IDE they write, comile, run and debug code and takes the work organicing files.
So I can say codeblocks is a very good and easy tool.
Is my bad english enougth?

InTroubleNow
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Sep 25, 2016 8:10 pm

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Sun Sep 25, 2016 9:42 pm

If there is one thing I have learned through the years, it is that: There is ALWAYS more than one way complete a task AND that the tools used to complete the task will vary widely depending on the primary objective/s of the entity (or company) AND that companies and their projects come with varying complexities and time constraints AND that everyone has their own idea about which tools should be used to meet those objectives.

Wait ... that was four things ... unless your a lawyer.

I have programmed a DEC PDP-8, via toggle switches, and programmed the Intel 4040 using only a programming card back in the late '70s. I have programmed, in Assembly, data exchange programs between a Perkin-Elmer(Interdata) 7/32 and "Desktop" computers using MicroSoft DOS 1.0 using RS232 protocol. I have written Assembly code for CNC interface and maintenance programs on the DEC PDP-11/34c. I have also programmed in Basic, Visual Basic, Python, Fortran IV and Fortran VII, and C++. I have held the position of Draftsman(Draftsperson), Electronic Engineering Technician, Electronic Maintenance Tech., Associate Electrical Engineer, Engineering Manager, Operations Manager, General Manager, and presently, Parts Sales/Customer Service Manager at AutoZone (was time for a career change AND I enjoy helping people).

I write all this to say ... all tools are created out of a sense of necessity and each tool has it's place. Obviously, technology has changed much since I was first introduced. One upside of coding in Assembler is that the code SHOULD BE the most efficient. On the other hand, using a high-level language is easier to produce code, but MAY generate less efficient code. Similarly, IDEs and Editors both have their place depending on the size of the project.

I once interviewed an "Engineer" with a Masters Degree for a Electrical Engineering position. I asked the person to sketch a simple schematic of a linear power supply. He could not do it ... either he was not taught the basics or they didn't stick. When I asked what he would do if he needed a power supply in his project, he said, "I would just buy one." My suggestion to anyone wanting to learn computer programming would be to learn to code in The Assembly Language first. Once you learn to walk, it is easier to learn to run. Once you learn to run, then learn to know when to walk and when to run.

So ... pick a tool that works for you ... get to work ... and get the job DONE!

tito-t
Posts: 298
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2016 5:14 pm

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Mon Sep 26, 2016 7:17 am

as an IDE I am absolutely fine with using Geany.
- Tim

User avatar
PeterO
Posts: 5003
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2012 4:14 pm

Re: Recommeded C++ dev environment ?

Mon Sep 26, 2016 7:25 am

InTroubleNow wrote:If there is one thing I have learned through the years,
Is it not to look how old a thread is before you post to it ? :lol:

PeterO
Discoverer of the PI2 XENON DEATH FLASH!
Interests: C,Python,PIC,Electronics,Ham Radio (G0DZB),1960s British Computers.
"The primary requirement (as we've always seen in your examples) is that the code is readable. " Dougie Lawson

Return to “C/C++”